Prospective Associations Between Coping and Health Among Youth With Asthma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study evaluated whether primary and secondary coping would predict longitudinal asthma-related clinical outcomes, such as peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and self-reported school absenteeism, rescue inhaler use, and asthma-related physician contacts, in youth with asthma. The 62 youth (68% males) had an average age of 12.6 ± 2.73 years and were primarily of European origin. Coping and asthma outcomes were obtained by youth self-report at baseline and over a 12-month follow-up period. Greater secondary coping at baseline was related to greater increases in PEFR and a greater likelihood of physician contact over the following year. Greater primary coping at baseline was related to greater likelihood of rescue inhaler use, school absenteeism, and physician contact over the following year. In contrast, asthma measures at baseline did not predict changes in coping over the following year. These patterns suggest that youth who engage in secondary coping accept and adapt to their asthma in ways that improve pulmonary function over time. Youth who engage in primary coping may be more likely to communicate asthma problems to others, and such communication perhaps leads to increases in behaviors meant to address these problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)790-798
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

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Asthma
Health
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Absenteeism
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Physicians
Self Report
Communication
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Prospective Associations Between Coping and Health Among Youth With Asthma. / Schreier, Hannah M.C.; Chen, Edith.

In: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, Vol. 76, No. 5, 01.10.2008, p. 790-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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