Prostatodynia in United Nations peacekeeping forces in Haiti

Joseph Drabick, John F. Mackey, Jeffrey M. Gambel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostatodynia is a clinical entity associated with voiding symptoms and pelvic pain suggestive of prostatitis but with a normal prostate examination and without evidence of inflammation or infection in expressed prostatic secretions. The problem tends to be chronic and is vexing in its management. Although thought to be a common condition, prevalence data are generally lacking. From June to October 1995, the U.S. Army's 86th Combat Support Hospital provided medical support to a multinational United Nations peacekeeping force in Haiti. Patients diagnosed with prostatodynia were more common (13 cases) than men with other urologic problems (urolithiasis, 6 cases; urinary tract infection, 6 cases; scrotal abscess/mass, 2 cases; epididymitis, 1 case). Patients tended to be young (mean age 29.8), had multiple visits, failed to respond to multiple courses of antibiotics for presumed 'prostatitis,' and denied recent sexual relations. Some patients reported having had similar symptoms on prolonged separation from their spouses in the past that resolved with resumption of normal intercourse. Masturbation, however, had no impact on symptoms and was painful in some individuals. Terazosin, an alpha-antagonist, and stress-reduction therapy led to improvement in some patients' symptoms. A discussion of these retrospective findings in light of what is known about the possible etiologies and treatment of proststodynia is presented. Prostatodynia appears to be a common problem in deployed troops and can lead to frequent use of medical services. Physicians supporting long deployments need to be aware of this entity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-383
Number of pages4
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume162
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1997

Fingerprint

Haiti
United Nations
Prostatitis
Terazosin
Masturbation
Epididymitis
Urolithiasis
Pelvic Pain
Spouses
Urinary Tract Infections
Abscess
Prostate
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Inflammation
Physicians
Therapeutics
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Drabick, J., Mackey, J. F., & Gambel, J. M. (1997). Prostatodynia in United Nations peacekeeping forces in Haiti. Military Medicine, 162(6), 380-383.
Drabick, Joseph ; Mackey, John F. ; Gambel, Jeffrey M. / Prostatodynia in United Nations peacekeeping forces in Haiti. In: Military Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 162, No. 6. pp. 380-383.
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Drabick, J, Mackey, JF & Gambel, JM 1997, 'Prostatodynia in United Nations peacekeeping forces in Haiti', Military Medicine, vol. 162, no. 6, pp. 380-383.

Prostatodynia in United Nations peacekeeping forces in Haiti. / Drabick, Joseph; Mackey, John F.; Gambel, Jeffrey M.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 162, No. 6, 06.1997, p. 380-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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