Protein supplementation for growing cattle fed a corn silage-based diet

T. L. Felix, S. C. Loerch, F. L. Fluharty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objectives were to determine effects of protein supplementation in corn silage-based diets on growing cattle performance and economics of gain. In Exp. 1, steers (n = 144; initial BW = 269 ± 60 kg) were blocked by BW. The 6 pens within each block were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 protein supplements: 1) urea, 2) soybean meal, or 3) dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS). The diets contained 79% corn silage and 21% CP, vitamin, and mineral supplement (DM basis). Protein supplements were formulated to achieve 11.5% total dietary protein (DM basis) and were fed for 84 d. In Exp. 2, steers (n = 34, initial BW = 198 ± 28 kg) and heifers (n = 19, initial BW = 194 ± 42 kg) were blocked by sex and allotted to 9 pens (3 pens of heifers and 6 pens of steers). Pens within block were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 protein supplements: 1) 11% CP, 2) 12% CP, or 3) 13% CP. Urea was used to increase protein concentrations by treatment, and diets contained 90% corn silage and 10% corn-based supplement containing urea, vitamins, and minerals (DM basis). In Exp. 1, cattle fed DDGS and soybean meal had greater (P < 0.01) ADG, DMI, G:F, and final BW than those fed urea-based protein supplements with corn-silage diets. Ingredient price differences resulted in cattle fed DDGS having the least (P < 0.01) cost per kilograms of BW gain. In Exp. 2, increasing dietary urea concentration tended to linearly decrease (P = 0.08) ADG and G:F. Cattle fed 11 or 12% CP had the least cost per kilograms of BW gain. Cattle fed soybean meal or DDGS with corn silage had comparable growth performance, and using DDGS as a protein supplement to corn silage-based diets provided the most economical return.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-332
Number of pages6
JournalProfessional Animal Scientist
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2014

Fingerprint

Silage
cattle feeds
protein supplements
corn silage
distillers grains
Zea mays
Diet
urea
Urea
corn
diet
soybean meal
Soybeans
Proteins
Meals
heifers
vitamins
Vitamins
Minerals
minerals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

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title = "Protein supplementation for growing cattle fed a corn silage-based diet",
abstract = "The objectives were to determine effects of protein supplementation in corn silage-based diets on growing cattle performance and economics of gain. In Exp. 1, steers (n = 144; initial BW = 269 ± 60 kg) were blocked by BW. The 6 pens within each block were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 protein supplements: 1) urea, 2) soybean meal, or 3) dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS). The diets contained 79{\%} corn silage and 21{\%} CP, vitamin, and mineral supplement (DM basis). Protein supplements were formulated to achieve 11.5{\%} total dietary protein (DM basis) and were fed for 84 d. In Exp. 2, steers (n = 34, initial BW = 198 ± 28 kg) and heifers (n = 19, initial BW = 194 ± 42 kg) were blocked by sex and allotted to 9 pens (3 pens of heifers and 6 pens of steers). Pens within block were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 protein supplements: 1) 11{\%} CP, 2) 12{\%} CP, or 3) 13{\%} CP. Urea was used to increase protein concentrations by treatment, and diets contained 90{\%} corn silage and 10{\%} corn-based supplement containing urea, vitamins, and minerals (DM basis). In Exp. 1, cattle fed DDGS and soybean meal had greater (P < 0.01) ADG, DMI, G:F, and final BW than those fed urea-based protein supplements with corn-silage diets. Ingredient price differences resulted in cattle fed DDGS having the least (P < 0.01) cost per kilograms of BW gain. In Exp. 2, increasing dietary urea concentration tended to linearly decrease (P = 0.08) ADG and G:F. Cattle fed 11 or 12{\%} CP had the least cost per kilograms of BW gain. Cattle fed soybean meal or DDGS with corn silage had comparable growth performance, and using DDGS as a protein supplement to corn silage-based diets provided the most economical return.",
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Protein supplementation for growing cattle fed a corn silage-based diet. / Felix, T. L.; Loerch, S. C.; Fluharty, F. L.

In: Professional Animal Scientist, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.06.2014, p. 327-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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