Provision of foods differing in energy density affects long-term weight loss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The energy density (kilocalories per gram) of foods influences short-term energy intake. This 1-year clinical trial tested the effect on weight loss of a diet incorporating one or two servings per day of foods equal in energy but differing in energy density. Research Methods and Procedures: Dietitians instructed 200 overweight and obese women and men to follow an exchange-based energy-restricted diet. Additionally, subjects were randomized to consume daily either one or two servings of low energy-dense soup, two servings of high energy-dense snack foods, or no special food (comparison group). Results: All four groups showed significant weight loss at 6 months that was well maintained at 12 months. The magnitude of weight loss, however, differed by group (p = 0.006). At 1 year, weight loss in the comparison (8.1 ± 1.1 kg) and two-soup (7.2 ± 0.9 kg) groups was significantly greater than that in the two-snack group (4.8 ± 0.7 kg); weight loss in the one-soup group (6.1 ± 1.1 kg) did not differ significantly from other groups. Weight loss was significantly correlated with the decrease in dietary energy density from baseline at 1 and 2 months (p = 0.0001) but not at 6 and 12 months. Discussion: On an energy-restricted diet, consuming two servings of low energy-dense soup daily led to 50% greater weight loss than consuming the same amount of energy as high energy-dense snack food. Regularly consuming foods that are low in energy density can be an effective strategy for weight management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1052-1060
Number of pages9
JournalObesity Research
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

energy density
energy content
Weight Loss
weight loss
soups
Food
Snacks
energy
snack foods
low calorie diet
Reducing Diet
Diet
Nutritionists
Energy Intake
food groups
snacks
dietitians
weight control
research methods
clinical trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{54b623b2296e4ba8a760118b7e645a5e,
title = "Provision of foods differing in energy density affects long-term weight loss",
abstract = "Objective: The energy density (kilocalories per gram) of foods influences short-term energy intake. This 1-year clinical trial tested the effect on weight loss of a diet incorporating one or two servings per day of foods equal in energy but differing in energy density. Research Methods and Procedures: Dietitians instructed 200 overweight and obese women and men to follow an exchange-based energy-restricted diet. Additionally, subjects were randomized to consume daily either one or two servings of low energy-dense soup, two servings of high energy-dense snack foods, or no special food (comparison group). Results: All four groups showed significant weight loss at 6 months that was well maintained at 12 months. The magnitude of weight loss, however, differed by group (p = 0.006). At 1 year, weight loss in the comparison (8.1 ± 1.1 kg) and two-soup (7.2 ± 0.9 kg) groups was significantly greater than that in the two-snack group (4.8 ± 0.7 kg); weight loss in the one-soup group (6.1 ± 1.1 kg) did not differ significantly from other groups. Weight loss was significantly correlated with the decrease in dietary energy density from baseline at 1 and 2 months (p = 0.0001) but not at 6 and 12 months. Discussion: On an energy-restricted diet, consuming two servings of low energy-dense soup daily led to 50{\%} greater weight loss than consuming the same amount of energy as high energy-dense snack food. Regularly consuming foods that are low in energy density can be an effective strategy for weight management.",
author = "Rolls, {Barbara J.} and Roe, {Liane S.} and Beach, {Amanda M.} and Kris-Etherton, {Penny M.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/oby.2005.123",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "1052--1060",
journal = "Obesity",
issn = "1930-7381",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Provision of foods differing in energy density affects long-term weight loss. / Rolls, Barbara J.; Roe, Liane S.; Beach, Amanda M.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

In: Obesity Research, Vol. 13, No. 6, 01.01.2005, p. 1052-1060.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Provision of foods differing in energy density affects long-term weight loss

AU - Rolls, Barbara J.

AU - Roe, Liane S.

AU - Beach, Amanda M.

AU - Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Objective: The energy density (kilocalories per gram) of foods influences short-term energy intake. This 1-year clinical trial tested the effect on weight loss of a diet incorporating one or two servings per day of foods equal in energy but differing in energy density. Research Methods and Procedures: Dietitians instructed 200 overweight and obese women and men to follow an exchange-based energy-restricted diet. Additionally, subjects were randomized to consume daily either one or two servings of low energy-dense soup, two servings of high energy-dense snack foods, or no special food (comparison group). Results: All four groups showed significant weight loss at 6 months that was well maintained at 12 months. The magnitude of weight loss, however, differed by group (p = 0.006). At 1 year, weight loss in the comparison (8.1 ± 1.1 kg) and two-soup (7.2 ± 0.9 kg) groups was significantly greater than that in the two-snack group (4.8 ± 0.7 kg); weight loss in the one-soup group (6.1 ± 1.1 kg) did not differ significantly from other groups. Weight loss was significantly correlated with the decrease in dietary energy density from baseline at 1 and 2 months (p = 0.0001) but not at 6 and 12 months. Discussion: On an energy-restricted diet, consuming two servings of low energy-dense soup daily led to 50% greater weight loss than consuming the same amount of energy as high energy-dense snack food. Regularly consuming foods that are low in energy density can be an effective strategy for weight management.

AB - Objective: The energy density (kilocalories per gram) of foods influences short-term energy intake. This 1-year clinical trial tested the effect on weight loss of a diet incorporating one or two servings per day of foods equal in energy but differing in energy density. Research Methods and Procedures: Dietitians instructed 200 overweight and obese women and men to follow an exchange-based energy-restricted diet. Additionally, subjects were randomized to consume daily either one or two servings of low energy-dense soup, two servings of high energy-dense snack foods, or no special food (comparison group). Results: All four groups showed significant weight loss at 6 months that was well maintained at 12 months. The magnitude of weight loss, however, differed by group (p = 0.006). At 1 year, weight loss in the comparison (8.1 ± 1.1 kg) and two-soup (7.2 ± 0.9 kg) groups was significantly greater than that in the two-snack group (4.8 ± 0.7 kg); weight loss in the one-soup group (6.1 ± 1.1 kg) did not differ significantly from other groups. Weight loss was significantly correlated with the decrease in dietary energy density from baseline at 1 and 2 months (p = 0.0001) but not at 6 and 12 months. Discussion: On an energy-restricted diet, consuming two servings of low energy-dense soup daily led to 50% greater weight loss than consuming the same amount of energy as high energy-dense snack food. Regularly consuming foods that are low in energy density can be an effective strategy for weight management.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=26844446623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=26844446623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/oby.2005.123

DO - 10.1038/oby.2005.123

M3 - Article

C2 - 15976148

AN - SCOPUS:26844446623

VL - 13

SP - 1052

EP - 1060

JO - Obesity

JF - Obesity

SN - 1930-7381

IS - 6

ER -