"Psst ... what do you think?" the relationship between advice prestige, type of advice, and academic performance

Rachel Annette Smith, Brittany L. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between classmates seeking out a student for advice (advice prestige) and that student's academic performance. Students' conversations could inhibit or encourage their academic performance depending on the conversation's topic. Specifically, it is hypothesized that as more classmates report asking a student for general advice, then the student would perform less well. In contrast, it is hypothesized that as more classmates report asking a student for class advice, then the student would perform better. Hypotheses (n =139) were supported. Even after controlling for sex and GPA, less general-advice prestige and higher class-advice prestige relates to higher academic performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-291
Number of pages14
JournalCommunication Education
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

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"Psst ... what do you think?" the relationship between advice prestige, type of advice, and academic performance. / Smith, Rachel Annette; Peterson, Brittany L.

In: Communication Education, Vol. 56, No. 3, 01.07.2007, p. 278-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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