Psycholinguistic and educational implications of deafness

John D. Bonvillian, Veda R. Charrow, Keith Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The linguistic abilities, cognitive abilities, and educational achievements of the deaf are reviewed. The evidence reviewed indicates three conclusions about the abilities of deaf persons relative to hearing persons: (1) The deaf are not deficient in intellectual competence, thus weaker skills in English and lower educational achievement require other explanations; (2) despite marked deficiencies in using and processing English,a great number of deaf persons can communicate effectively in sign language; (3) similar linguistic abilities underlie effective use of sign language and spoken language, a conclusion supported by analyses of both sign language structure and the acquisition of sign language by young deaf children. Increased use of sign language in educating the deaf is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-345
Number of pages25
JournalHuman Development
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1973

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Psycholinguistics
Sign Language
Deafness
Aptitude
Persons With Hearing Impairments
Educational Status
Linguistics
Mental Competency
Hearing
Language

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Bonvillian, John D. ; Charrow, Veda R. ; Nelson, Keith. / Psycholinguistic and educational implications of deafness. In: Human Development. 1973 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 321-345.
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Psycholinguistic and educational implications of deafness. / Bonvillian, John D.; Charrow, Veda R.; Nelson, Keith.

In: Human Development, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.01.1973, p. 321-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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