Psycholinguistic perspectives on second language learning and bilingualism the course and consequence of cross-language competition

Judith F. Kroll, Cari A. Bogulski, Rhonda Mudry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent psycholinguistic research demonstrates that using a second language has consequences for the first language (e.g. Dussias, 2003; Van Hell & Dijkstra, 2002) and for domain-general cognitive processes (Bialystok, 2005). This work suggests that the language system is permeable, with cross-language exchange at every level of processing (Malt & Sloman, 2003). Critically, even proficient bilinguals appear unable to switch off the language not in use when they hear, read, or speak one language alone (e.g. Dijkstra, 2005; Kroll, Bobb, & Wodniecka, 2006; Marian & Spivey, 2003), creating cross-language competition. In this article, we describe research that considers how cross-language activation is modulated during spoken production and during the earliest stages of second language learning. We hypothesize that the open nature of the bilingual's language system may create optimal conditions for new language learning and also for enhanced cognitive control that enables effective selection of the language to be spoken.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-24
Number of pages24
JournalLinguistic Approaches to Bilingualism
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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psycholinguistics
multilingualism
language
learning
Second Language Learning
Language
Bilingualism
Psycholinguistics
Cross-language
activation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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Psycholinguistic perspectives on second language learning and bilingualism the course and consequence of cross-language competition. / Kroll, Judith F.; Bogulski, Cari A.; Mudry, Rhonda.

In: Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 1-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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