Psychopathology, craving, and mood during heroin acquisition: An experimental study

Steven M. Mirin, Roger E. Meyer, H. Brian Mcnamee, Mark Mcdougle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six detoxified addict volunteers were allowed to self-administer intravenous heroin on an essentially self-determined schedule. Two periods of heroin acquisition were compared: an unmodified cycle in which patients could become intoxicated and a later cycle in which the effects of heroin were blocked with a narcotic antagonist. In the unblocked condition, patients initially experienced an increase in positive mood, but with chronic administration there was a significant rise in psychopathology and the development of a generalized dysphoric state. Similar changes did not occur when the same patients took heroin while blocked with a narcotic antagonist. Drug craving rose dramatically when "unblocked" heroin was available, but gradually fell during methadone detoxification. Following treatment with a narcotic antagonist, the presence of heroin failed to elicit any sustained rise in craving and drug taking was dramatically reduced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)525-544
Number of pages20
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1976

Fingerprint

Heroin
psychopathology
Psychopathology
mood
drug
Narcotic Antagonists
addiction
Methadone
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Craving
Volunteers
Appointments and Schedules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Mirin, Steven M. ; Meyer, Roger E. ; Mcnamee, H. Brian ; Mcdougle, Mark. / Psychopathology, craving, and mood during heroin acquisition : An experimental study. In: Substance Use and Misuse. 1976 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 525-544.
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Psychopathology, craving, and mood during heroin acquisition : An experimental study. / Mirin, Steven M.; Meyer, Roger E.; Mcnamee, H. Brian; Mcdougle, Mark.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.01.1976, p. 525-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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