Psychosocial and Perceived Environmental Correlates of Physical Activity in Rural and Older African American and White Women

Sara Wilcox, Melissa Bopp, Larissa Oberrecht, Sandra K. Kammermann, Charles T. McElmurray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Scopus citations

Abstract

African American and rural older women are among the least active segments of the population. This study, guided by social cognitive theory, examined the correlates of physical activity (PA) in 102 rural older women (41% African American; 70.6 ± 9.2 years). In bivariate associations, education, marital status, self-efficacy, greater pros than cons, perceived stress, social support, and perceived neighborhood safety were positively associated with PA; age, depressive symptoms, perceived sidewalks, health care provider discussion of PA, and perceived traffic were negatively associated with PA. In a hierarchical regression analysis, the sociodemographic (R2 = 23%), psychological (IR2 = 9%), social (IR2 = 6%), and perceived physical environmental (IR2 = 9%) sets of variables were significant (p <.05) predictors of PA (model R2 = 47%). In response to open-ended questions, most women cited individual and social factors as PA barriers and motivators; falls, injuries, and heart attacks were identified most often as risks. These findings support the importance of multilevel influences on PA in older rural women and are useful for informing PA interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)P329-P337
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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