Psychosocial factors and hypertension prevalence among Ghanaians in Ghana and Ghanaian migrants in Europe: The RODAM study

Raphael Baffour Awuah, Ama de-Graft Aikins, F. Nii Amoo Dodoo, Karlijn A.C. Meeks, Eric J.A.J. Beune, Kerstin Klipstein-Grobusch, Juliet Addo, Liam Smeeth, Silver K. Bahendeka, Charles Agyemang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite progress made to prevent and control hypertension, its prevalence has persisted in many countries. This study examined the associations between psychosocial factors and hypertension among Ghanaian non-migrants and migrants. Data were drawn from the Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) project. Findings show that among migrant women, those who experienced periods of stress at home/work had higher odds of hypertension. Among non-migrants, women with depression symptoms were more likely to be hypertensive. Furthermore, there was a positive association between negative life events and hypertension among non-migrant men. The findings highlight the importance of psychosocial factors in addressing hypertension prevalence in Ghanaian populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Psychology Open
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Psychosocial factors and hypertension prevalence among Ghanaians in Ghana and Ghanaian migrants in Europe: The RODAM study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this