Psychosocial resources, adolescent risk behaviour and young adult adjustment

Is risk taking more dangerous for some than others?

Jennifer Maggs, Pamela M. Frome, Jacquelynne S. Eccles, Bonnie L. Barber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Longitudinal analyses examined the extent to which adolescent alcohol use, illegal drug use, and antisocial behaviour predicted adjustment and risk behaviour during young adulthood, and whether psychosocial resources buffered any impact of risk-taking. American adolescents completed questionnaires in Grade 12 and 2 years later (n = 694). Personal and social resources predicted success in occupational, relational, and health domains. High school risk behaviours predicted decreased success in relational domains, and alcohol use predicted higher educational attainment, independent of the relations with psychosocial resources. Interactions of resources with risk behaviours predicting adjustment were inconsistent, but resources predicted decreased risk behaviours in young adulthood among adolescent risk-takers. Discussion focuses on the value of, and challenges to, research on consequences of adolescent risk taking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-119
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Social Adjustment
Adolescent Behavior
Risk-Taking
Young Adult
Occupational Health
Alcohols
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Psychosocial resources, adolescent risk behaviour and young adult adjustment : Is risk taking more dangerous for some than others? / Maggs, Jennifer; Frome, Pamela M.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.; Barber, Bonnie L.

In: Journal of Adolescence, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 103-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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