Public health significance of antimicrobial-resistant gram-negative bacteria in raw bulk tank milk

B. A. Straley, S. C. Donaldson, N. V. Hedge, A. A. Sawant, V. Srinivasan, S. P. Oliver, Bhushan M. Jayarao

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dairy farm environment and animals on the farm serve as important reservoirs of pathogenic and commensal bacteria that could potentially gain access to milk in the bulk tank via several pathways. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria can gain access to bulk tank milk from infected mammary glands, contaminated udders and milking machines, and/or from the dairy farm environment. Contaminated raw milk when consumed by humans or fed to animals on the farm can result in gastroenteric infections in humans and animals and also provide an opportunity for organisms to colonize the farm environment. This scenario becomes much more complicated when pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and commensal gram-negative enteric bacteria encode for antimicrobial resistance determinants. In recent years, the role of commensal bacteria as reservoirs of genetic determinants for antimicrobial resistance has come under closer scrutiny. Commensal bacteria in bulk tank milk can be a significant reservoir of antimicrobial determinants. Raw milk consumption can result in exposure to antimicrobial-resistant commensal gram-negative bacteria. This paper examines the prevalence and role of commensal gram-negative enteric bacteria in bulk tank milk and their public health significance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-233
Number of pages12
JournalFoodborne pathogens and disease
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

Fingerprint

milk tanks
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Gram-negative bacteria
public health
Milk
Public Health
anti-infective agents
milk
Bacteria
bacteria
raw milk
intestinal microorganisms
antibiotic resistance
dairy farming
farms
Domestic Animals
Enterobacteriaceae
milking machines
animals
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Straley, B. A. ; Donaldson, S. C. ; Hedge, N. V. ; Sawant, A. A. ; Srinivasan, V. ; Oliver, S. P. ; Jayarao, Bhushan M. / Public health significance of antimicrobial-resistant gram-negative bacteria in raw bulk tank milk. In: Foodborne pathogens and disease. 2006 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 222-233.
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Public health significance of antimicrobial-resistant gram-negative bacteria in raw bulk tank milk. / Straley, B. A.; Donaldson, S. C.; Hedge, N. V.; Sawant, A. A.; Srinivasan, V.; Oliver, S. P.; Jayarao, Bhushan M.

In: Foodborne pathogens and disease, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.09.2006, p. 222-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Srinivasan, V.

AU - Oliver, S. P.

AU - Jayarao, Bhushan M.

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N2 - The dairy farm environment and animals on the farm serve as important reservoirs of pathogenic and commensal bacteria that could potentially gain access to milk in the bulk tank via several pathways. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria can gain access to bulk tank milk from infected mammary glands, contaminated udders and milking machines, and/or from the dairy farm environment. Contaminated raw milk when consumed by humans or fed to animals on the farm can result in gastroenteric infections in humans and animals and also provide an opportunity for organisms to colonize the farm environment. This scenario becomes much more complicated when pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and commensal gram-negative enteric bacteria encode for antimicrobial resistance determinants. In recent years, the role of commensal bacteria as reservoirs of genetic determinants for antimicrobial resistance has come under closer scrutiny. Commensal bacteria in bulk tank milk can be a significant reservoir of antimicrobial determinants. Raw milk consumption can result in exposure to antimicrobial-resistant commensal gram-negative bacteria. This paper examines the prevalence and role of commensal gram-negative enteric bacteria in bulk tank milk and their public health significance.

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