Public perceptions of population changes in Hungary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the public perceptions of population dynamics in Hungary. Based on a representative national sample survey from 2005, we discuss how the general public perceives demographic trends and attitudes people have towards the possible reasons behind these trends and solutions they believe are appropriate to contend with the trends. Rural populations were expected to have poorer knowledge of current population trends and changes and more conservative attitudes toward controversial demographic issues, but this expectation was not supported by the data. Since relatively little research has been conducted on population literacy, this study contributes to a better understanding of how public perceptions on population are formed and how this knowledge and attitudes may affect public policy addressing demographic trends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-36
Number of pages14
JournalEastern European Countryside
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Hungary
demographic trend
trend
literacy
rural population
population dynamics
population development
public policy
public

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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title = "Public perceptions of population changes in Hungary",
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Public perceptions of population changes in Hungary. / Kulcsár, László J.; Brown, David.

In: Eastern European Countryside, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 23-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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