Public policy on alcohol in the United Kingdom: towards a safety net for the alcohol-dependent.

Laura Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Public policy on alcohol in the United Kingdom fails to support, and may even undermine, the wellbeing of those with the worst alcohol misuse problems, the alcohol-dependent. This is partly because it evades the thorny issue of impaired control that characterises dependence. In addition, until recently, all United Kingdom alcohol policy focused on improving individualised treatment for the dependent, rather than attending to the wider social and environmental factors that influence the condition. The efforts of policy to normalise "sensible" drinking, while stigmatising drunkenness, also risk exacerbating the social vulnerability of the alcohol-dependent. The article examines these issues and concludes by pointing to a number of developments that are required to help ensure that the dependent do not continue to fall through policy that claims to be inclusive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-399
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of law and medicine
Volume17
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Public Policy
public policy
alcohol
Alcohols
Safety
Alcoholic Intoxication
Drinking
social factors
environmental factors
vulnerability
United Kingdom

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Health Policy
  • Law

Cite this

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Public policy on alcohol in the United Kingdom : towards a safety net for the alcohol-dependent. / Williamson, Laura.

In: Journal of law and medicine, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.12.2009, p. 386-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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