Public reporting and market area exit decisions by home health agencies

Kyoungrae Jung, Roger Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether home health agencies selectively discontinue services to areas with socio-economically disadvantaged people after the introduction of Home Health Compare (HHC), a public reporting program initiated by Medicare in 2003. Study Design /Methods: We focused on agencies' initial responses to HHC and examined selective market-area exits by agencies between 2002 and 2004. We measured HHC effects by the percentage of quality indicators reported in public HHC data in 2003. Socio-economic status was measured by per capita income and percent college-educated at the market-area level. Data Source(s): 2002 and 2004 Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS); 2000 US Census file; 2004 Area Resource File; and 2002 Provider of Service File. Principal Findings: We found a small and weak effect of public reporting on selective exits: a 10-percent increase in reporting (reporting one more indicator) increased the probability of leaving an area with less-educated people by 0.3 percentage points, compared with leaving an area with high education. Conclusion: The small level of market-area exits under public reporting is unlikely to be practically meaningful, suggesting that HHC did not lead to a disruption in access to home health care through selective exits during the initial year of the program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMedicare and Medicaid Research Review
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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Home Care Agencies
Health
Health Services Accessibility
Information Storage and Retrieval
Vulnerable Populations
Censuses
Home Care Services
Medicare
Public Health
Economics
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

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Public reporting and market area exit decisions by home health agencies. / Jung, Kyoungrae; Feldman, Roger.

In: Medicare and Medicaid Research Review, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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