Pulmonary and other health effects of electronic cigarette use among adult smokers participating in a randomized controlled smoking reduction trial

Susan Veldheer, Jessica Yingst, Vishal Midya, Breianna Hummer, Courtney Lester, Nicolle Krebs, Shari Hrabovsky, Ashley Wilhelm, Jiangang (Jason) Liao, Miao Shan Yen, Caroline Cobb, Thomas Eissenberg, Jonathan Foulds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is limited evidence about the effects of dual electronic cigarette (e-cig) and combustible cigarette use on lung health or other health outcomes. Studies that have evaluated these outcomes have not included estimates of e-cig or cigarette exposure in the analyses. Materials and methods: Data analyzed were from 263 smokers participating in a randomized controlled trial designed to encourage participants to reduce their combustible cigarette use by substituting with an e-cig or a non-electronic cigarette substitute (cig-sub). t-tests were used to evaluate changes from baseline at 1 month and 3 months in lung function, blood pressure, pulse, exhaled carbon monoxide, and weight. Linear mixed effects models were used to test associations between health outcomes and study product group, including exposure to the study products (e-cig and cig-sub times used and days used in the past 7 days) and cigarettes per day (CPD). Results: There were few significant differences between the groups for lung function indices at any time point in the unadjusted analyses. There were significant reductions in diastolic blood pressure and pulse at 1 month in the unadjusted analyses for those in the e-cig group compared to the cig-sub group. CPD decreased significantly more for the e-cig group than for the cig-sub group at both time points. There were no significant associations between any measured health outcomes and group in the linear mixed effects models. Conclusion: E-cig use did not contribute to significant changes in health outcome markers as compared with use of a non-electronic cig-sub.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-101
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume91
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Tobacco Products
Smoking
Health
Lung
Blood Pressure
Electronic Cigarettes
Blood pressure
Carbon Monoxide
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Veldheer, Susan ; Yingst, Jessica ; Midya, Vishal ; Hummer, Breianna ; Lester, Courtney ; Krebs, Nicolle ; Hrabovsky, Shari ; Wilhelm, Ashley ; Liao, Jiangang (Jason) ; Yen, Miao Shan ; Cobb, Caroline ; Eissenberg, Thomas ; Foulds, Jonathan. / Pulmonary and other health effects of electronic cigarette use among adult smokers participating in a randomized controlled smoking reduction trial. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2019 ; Vol. 91. pp. 95-101.
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abstract = "Background: There is limited evidence about the effects of dual electronic cigarette (e-cig) and combustible cigarette use on lung health or other health outcomes. Studies that have evaluated these outcomes have not included estimates of e-cig or cigarette exposure in the analyses. Materials and methods: Data analyzed were from 263 smokers participating in a randomized controlled trial designed to encourage participants to reduce their combustible cigarette use by substituting with an e-cig or a non-electronic cigarette substitute (cig-sub). t-tests were used to evaluate changes from baseline at 1 month and 3 months in lung function, blood pressure, pulse, exhaled carbon monoxide, and weight. Linear mixed effects models were used to test associations between health outcomes and study product group, including exposure to the study products (e-cig and cig-sub times used and days used in the past 7 days) and cigarettes per day (CPD). Results: There were few significant differences between the groups for lung function indices at any time point in the unadjusted analyses. There were significant reductions in diastolic blood pressure and pulse at 1 month in the unadjusted analyses for those in the e-cig group compared to the cig-sub group. CPD decreased significantly more for the e-cig group than for the cig-sub group at both time points. There were no significant associations between any measured health outcomes and group in the linear mixed effects models. Conclusion: E-cig use did not contribute to significant changes in health outcome markers as compared with use of a non-electronic cig-sub.",
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Pulmonary and other health effects of electronic cigarette use among adult smokers participating in a randomized controlled smoking reduction trial. / Veldheer, Susan; Yingst, Jessica; Midya, Vishal; Hummer, Breianna; Lester, Courtney; Krebs, Nicolle; Hrabovsky, Shari; Wilhelm, Ashley; Liao, Jiangang (Jason); Yen, Miao Shan; Cobb, Caroline; Eissenberg, Thomas; Foulds, Jonathan.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 91, 01.04.2019, p. 95-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Pulmonary and other health effects of electronic cigarette use among adult smokers participating in a randomized controlled smoking reduction trial

AU - Veldheer, Susan

AU - Yingst, Jessica

AU - Midya, Vishal

AU - Hummer, Breianna

AU - Lester, Courtney

AU - Krebs, Nicolle

AU - Hrabovsky, Shari

AU - Wilhelm, Ashley

AU - Liao, Jiangang (Jason)

AU - Yen, Miao Shan

AU - Cobb, Caroline

AU - Eissenberg, Thomas

AU - Foulds, Jonathan

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Background: There is limited evidence about the effects of dual electronic cigarette (e-cig) and combustible cigarette use on lung health or other health outcomes. Studies that have evaluated these outcomes have not included estimates of e-cig or cigarette exposure in the analyses. Materials and methods: Data analyzed were from 263 smokers participating in a randomized controlled trial designed to encourage participants to reduce their combustible cigarette use by substituting with an e-cig or a non-electronic cigarette substitute (cig-sub). t-tests were used to evaluate changes from baseline at 1 month and 3 months in lung function, blood pressure, pulse, exhaled carbon monoxide, and weight. Linear mixed effects models were used to test associations between health outcomes and study product group, including exposure to the study products (e-cig and cig-sub times used and days used in the past 7 days) and cigarettes per day (CPD). Results: There were few significant differences between the groups for lung function indices at any time point in the unadjusted analyses. There were significant reductions in diastolic blood pressure and pulse at 1 month in the unadjusted analyses for those in the e-cig group compared to the cig-sub group. CPD decreased significantly more for the e-cig group than for the cig-sub group at both time points. There were no significant associations between any measured health outcomes and group in the linear mixed effects models. Conclusion: E-cig use did not contribute to significant changes in health outcome markers as compared with use of a non-electronic cig-sub.

AB - Background: There is limited evidence about the effects of dual electronic cigarette (e-cig) and combustible cigarette use on lung health or other health outcomes. Studies that have evaluated these outcomes have not included estimates of e-cig or cigarette exposure in the analyses. Materials and methods: Data analyzed were from 263 smokers participating in a randomized controlled trial designed to encourage participants to reduce their combustible cigarette use by substituting with an e-cig or a non-electronic cigarette substitute (cig-sub). t-tests were used to evaluate changes from baseline at 1 month and 3 months in lung function, blood pressure, pulse, exhaled carbon monoxide, and weight. Linear mixed effects models were used to test associations between health outcomes and study product group, including exposure to the study products (e-cig and cig-sub times used and days used in the past 7 days) and cigarettes per day (CPD). Results: There were few significant differences between the groups for lung function indices at any time point in the unadjusted analyses. There were significant reductions in diastolic blood pressure and pulse at 1 month in the unadjusted analyses for those in the e-cig group compared to the cig-sub group. CPD decreased significantly more for the e-cig group than for the cig-sub group at both time points. There were no significant associations between any measured health outcomes and group in the linear mixed effects models. Conclusion: E-cig use did not contribute to significant changes in health outcome markers as compared with use of a non-electronic cig-sub.

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