Quality and safety in orthopaedics: Learning and teaching at the same time: AOA critical issues

Kevin P. Black, April D. Armstrong, Lorraine Hutzler, Kenneth A. Egol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them. The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow. Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety. Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1809-1815
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume
Volume97
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2014

Fingerprint

Orthopedics
Teaching
Learning
Safety
Iatrogenic Disease
Safety Management
Medical Errors
Problem-Based Learning
Peer Review
Accreditation
Curriculum
Patient Care
Communication
Education
Orthopedic Surgeons
Practice (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{b6f5ecfbda094893a98e5731738c97ff,
title = "Quality and safety in orthopaedics: Learning and teaching at the same time: AOA critical issues",
abstract = "Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them. The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, {"}never events,{"} and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow. Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety. Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety.",
author = "Black, {Kevin P.} and Armstrong, {April D.} and Lorraine Hutzler and Egol, {Kenneth A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
day = "2",
doi = "10.2106/JBJS.O.00020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "97",
pages = "1809--1815",
journal = "Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A",
issn = "0021-9355",
publisher = "Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Inc.",
number = "21",

}

Quality and safety in orthopaedics : Learning and teaching at the same time: AOA critical issues. / Black, Kevin P.; Armstrong, April D.; Hutzler, Lorraine; Egol, Kenneth A.

In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume, Vol. 97, No. 21, 02.09.2014, p. 1809-1815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality and safety in orthopaedics

T2 - Learning and teaching at the same time: AOA critical issues

AU - Black, Kevin P.

AU - Armstrong, April D.

AU - Hutzler, Lorraine

AU - Egol, Kenneth A.

PY - 2014/9/2

Y1 - 2014/9/2

N2 - Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them. The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow. Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety. Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety.

AB - Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them. The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow. Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety. Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84957790326&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84957790326&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2106/JBJS.O.00020

DO - 10.2106/JBJS.O.00020

M3 - Article

C2 - 26537169

AN - SCOPUS:84957790326

VL - 97

SP - 1809

EP - 1815

JO - Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A

JF - Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A

SN - 0021-9355

IS - 21

ER -