Quantification of bacterial adhesion forces using atomic force microscopy (AFM)

Herbert H.P. Fang, Kwong Yu Chan, Lichong Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

196 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study demonstrated that atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images of bacteria, and to quantify the tip-cell interaction force and the surface elasticity. Results show that the adhesion force between the Si3N4 tip and the bacteria surface was in the range from -3.9 to -4.3 nN. On the other hand, the adhesion forces at the periphery of the cell-substratum contact surface ranged from -5.1 to -5.9 nN and those at the cell-cell interface ranged from -6.5 to -6.8 nN. The two latter forces were considerably greater than the former one, most likely due to the accumulation of extracellular polymer substance (EPS). Results also show that the elasticity varied on the cell surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-97
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Microbiological Methods
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Bacterial Adhesion
Atomic Force Microscopy
Elasticity
Bacteria
Cell Communication
Polymers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

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Quantification of bacterial adhesion forces using atomic force microscopy (AFM). / Fang, Herbert H.P.; Chan, Kwong Yu; Xu, Lichong.

In: Journal of Microbiological Methods, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 89-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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