Quantifying fatigue property changes in material jetted parts due to functionally graded material interface design

Dorcas V. Kaweesa, Nicholas A. Meisel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The capability of Additive Manufacturing (AM) to manufacture multi-materials allows the fabrication of complex and multifunctional objects with heterogeneous material compositions and varying mechanical properties. The material jetting AM process specifically has the capability to manufacture multi-material structures with both rigid and flexible material properties. Existing research has investigated the fatigue properties of 3D printed multi-material specimens and shows that there is a weakness at multi-material interfaces. This paper seeks to, instead, investigate the effects of gradual material transitions on the fatigue life of 3D printed multi-material specimens. In order to examine the fatigue life at the multi-material interface, stepwise gradients are compared against continuous gradients created through voxel-based design. Results demonstrate the effects of different material gradient patterns and different material transition lengths on the fatigue life of multi-material specimens. In addition, the behavior of individual material composites is studied to confirm how gradient designs based on different material compositions affect their material properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-149
Number of pages9
JournalAdditive Manufacturing
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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