Quantitative perceptual differences among over-the-counter vaginal products using a standardized methodology: Implications for microbicide development

Ellen D. Mahan, Kathleen M. Morrow, John E. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Increasing prevalence of HIV infection among women worldwide has motivated the development of female-initiated prevention methods, including gel-based microbicides. User acceptability is vital for microbicide success; however, varying cultural vaginal practices indicate multiple formulations must be developed to appeal to different populations. Perceptual attributes of microbicides have been identified as primary drivers of acceptability; however, previous studies do not allow for direct comparison of these qualities between multiple formulations. Study Design: Six vaginal products were analyzed ex vivo using descriptive analysis. Perceptual attributes of samples were identified by trained participants (n=10) and rated quantitatively using scales based on a panel-developed lexicon. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVAs for each attribute; product differences were assessed via Tukey's honestly significant difference test. Results: Significant differences were found between products for multiple attributes. Patterns were also seen for attributes across intended product usage (i.e., contraceptive, moisturizer or lubricant). For example, Options

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-193
Number of pages10
JournalContraception
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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