Quantitative proteomic analyses of cerebrospinal fluid using itraq in a primate model of iron deficiency anemia

Stephanie M. Patton, Christopher L. Coe, Gabriele R. Lubach, James R. Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron deficiency affects nearly 2 billion people worldwide, with pregnant women and young children being most severely impacted. Sustained anemia during the first year of life can cause cognitive, attention and motor deficits, which may persist despite iron supplementation. We conducted iTRAQ analyses on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from infant monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to identify differential protein expression associated with early iron deficiency. CSF was collected from 5 iron-sufficient and 8 iron-deficient anemic monkeys at weaning age (6-7 months) and again at 12-14 months. Despite consumption of iron-fortified food after weaning, which restored hematological indices into the normal range, expression of 5 proteins in the CSF remained altered. Most of the proteins identified are involved in neurite outgrowth, migration or synapse formation. The results reveal novel ways in which iron deficiency undermines brain growth and results in aberrant neuronal migration and connections. Taken together with gene expression data from rodent models of iron deficiency, we conclude that significant alterations in neuroconnectivity occur in the iron-deficient brain, which may persist even after resolution of the hematological anemia. The compromised brain infrastructure could account for observations of behavioral deficits in children during and after the period of anemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-365
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Neuroscience
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

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Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Proteomics
Primates
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Iron
Anemia
Weaning
Haplorhini
Brain
Fortified Food
Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins
Macaca mulatta
Synapses
Pregnant Women
Rodentia
Reference Values
Proteins
Gene Expression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

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Quantitative proteomic analyses of cerebrospinal fluid using itraq in a primate model of iron deficiency anemia. / Patton, Stephanie M.; Coe, Christopher L.; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Connor, James R.

In: Developmental Neuroscience, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.10.2012, p. 354-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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