Quilting as a generative activity: Studying those who make quilts for wounded service members

Cheryl Cheek, Robin G. Yaure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A qualitative study of 24 quilters examined their experiences creating and delivering quilts to wounded service members who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. Using Erikson’s (1963) perspective on generativity and Baumeister and Vohs’s (2002) theory of motivation as theoretical frameworks, along with McCracken’s (1988) five-step analysis model, we looked at the part motivation played in this process. The results were that respondents wanted to supply quilts in response to their own family histories of military involvement, to support friends/acquaintances with family in the military, and to make a difference to those who seemed young and badly wounded. Some respondents described being affected by the reactions of quilt recipients and of healing from their own traumas and grief.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-50
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Women and Aging
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

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Military
Motivation
model analysis
grief
Afghanistan
genealogy
Iraq
trauma
Grief
recipient
experience
Wounds and Injuries
Quilt
Surveys and Questionnaires
Conflict (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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Quilting as a generative activity : Studying those who make quilts for wounded service members. / Cheek, Cheryl; Yaure, Robin G.

In: Journal of Women and Aging, Vol. 29, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 39-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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