Racial and ethnic differences in the role of cohabitation in premarital childbearing

Wendy D. Manning, Nancy Susan Landale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The research reported in this article focuses on the role of cohabitation in premarital childbearing among U.S. women. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households and the New York Fertility, Employment and Migration Survey, we examine the influence of cohabitation on the likelihood of premarital pregnancy and the decision to marry between premarital conception and birth. Our analyses show marked racial and ethnic differences in the role of the cohabiting union in family building. Although cohabitation increases the rate of premarital pregnancy for all women, its effect is much greater among Puerto Ricans than among non-Hispanic Whites and African Americans. Cohabitation accelerates the transition to marriage among premaritally pregnant White women, but has no effect among Blacks and has a strong negative effect among Puerto Ricans. We interpret our findings in terms of long-standing family patterns and cultural traditions within each group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-77
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

cohabitation
pregnancy
fertility
marriage
migration
Cohabitation
Group
Puerto Rican
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Manning, Wendy D. ; Landale, Nancy Susan. / Racial and ethnic differences in the role of cohabitation in premarital childbearing. In: Journal of Marriage and Family. 1996 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 63-77.
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Racial and ethnic differences in the role of cohabitation in premarital childbearing. / Manning, Wendy D.; Landale, Nancy Susan.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 58, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 63-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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