Racial identity from adolescence to young adulthood

Does prior neighborhood experience matter?

Deborah Rivas-Drake, Dawn Paula Witherspoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the influence of earlier neighborhood experiences on trajectories of racial centrality and regard among Black youth. Data were drawn from a sample of Black 11- to 14-year-old youth (N = 718) in the Maryland Adolescent Development in Context Study, a data set that permits the examination of structural and subjective neighborhood influences. Results suggest that centrality increases, whereas public regard remains relatively stable, across the transition to adulthood. Seventh graders who resided in neighborhoods in which adults were less willing to intervene or respond to problematic situations reported lower public regard in 11th grade. In addition, the trajectory of private regard varied according to the types of neighborhoods youth experienced in early adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1918-1932
Number of pages15
JournalChild Development
Volume84
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

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adulthood
adolescence
experience
Adolescent Development
school grade
adolescent
examination

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Racial identity from adolescence to young adulthood : Does prior neighborhood experience matter? / Rivas-Drake, Deborah; Witherspoon, Dawn Paula.

In: Child Development, Vol. 84, No. 6, 01.11.2013, p. 1918-1932.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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