Racial profiling and the courts: An empirical analysis of federal litigation, 1991 to 2006

Shaun L. Gabbidon, Lakiesha N. Marzette, Steven A. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines 135 federal-level racial profiling cases. Based on a review of these cases, the research reveals that such cases are on the decline. Moreover, most of the persons alleging they were racially profiled were Black and Hispanic. More than half of the persons making racial profiling allegations were caught engaging in criminal activity during the incident that instigated the legal suit. In addition, most of the incidents involved multiple male officers, who were employed by local police departments. The research also found that persons making racial profiling allegations win in less than a third of the cases. The article concludes by discussing the implications of these results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-238
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Contemporary Criminal Justice
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007

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human being
incident
police

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Law

Cite this

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Racial profiling and the courts : An empirical analysis of federal litigation, 1991 to 2006. / Gabbidon, Shaun L.; Marzette, Lakiesha N.; Peterson, Steven A.

In: Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.08.2007, p. 226-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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