Radiation therapy dose and androgen deprivation therapy in localized prostate cancer: a meta-regression of 5-year outcomes in phase III randomized controlled trials

Tommy Jiang, Daniela Markovic, Jay Patel, Jesus E. Juarez, Ting Martin Ma, David Shabsovich, Nicholas G. Nickols, Robert E. Reiter, David Elashoff, Matthew B. Rettig, Nicholas G. Zaorsky, Daniel E. Spratt, Amar U. Kishan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: While multiple randomized trials have evaluated the benefit of radiation therapy (RT) dose escalation and the use and prolongation of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in the treatment of prostate cancer, few studies have evaluated the relative benefit of either form of treatment intensification with each other. Many trials have included treatment strategies that incorporate either high or low dose RT, or short-term or long-term ADT (STADT or LTADT), in one or more trial arms. We sought to compare different forms of treatment intensification of RT in the context of localized prostate cancer. Methods: Using preferred reporting items for systemic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we collected over 40 phases III clinical trials comparing different forms of RT for localized prostate cancer. We performed a meta-regression of 40 individual trials with 21,429 total patients to allow a comparison of the rates and cumulative proportions of 5-year overall survival (OS), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and distant metastasis (DM) for each treatment arm of every trial. Results: Dose-escalation either in the absence or presence of STADT failed to significantly improve any 5-year outcome. In contrast, adding LTADT to low dose RT significantly improved 5-year PCSM (Odds ratio [OR] 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22–0.54, p < 0.001) and DM (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.20–0.63. p < 0.001) over low dose RT alone. Adding STADT also significantly improved 5-year PCSM over low dose RT alone (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.41–0.75, p < 0.001). Conclusion: While limited by between-study heterogeneity and a lack of individual patient data, this meta-analysis suggests that adding ADT, versus increasing RT dose alone, offers a more consistent improvement in clinical endpoints.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalProstate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Urology
  • Cancer Research

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