RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER FROM WALL FLAMES.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Measurements of radiative and total heat transfer from flames to wall are presented for combustion of propane, methane, and natural gas. The radiative heat feedback from flames to the wall was determined from measurements using a narrow angle radiometer. The radiative fraction of the total heat feedback was found to be almost independent of the burner power output when plotted against scaled height. Flame radiation increased slightly with height or remained constant depending on the fuel, as long as the flames continuously covered the wall; above this height, it dropped rapidly with height. Among the three fuels tested, radiative fraction in flame-to-wall heat transfer was the maximum for propane and minimum for methane, which can be explained based on sooting characteristics of flames. The total radiative energy transfer as a fraction of the burner output power is also presented for the three fuels.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)9-16
    Number of pages8
    JournalAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Heat Transfer Division, (Publication) HTD
    Volume81
    StatePublished - 1987

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    Propane
    Methane
    Heat transfer
    Fuel burners
    Enthalpy
    Feedback
    Radiometers
    Energy transfer
    Natural gas
    Radiation
    Hot Temperature

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
    • Mechanical Engineering

    Cite this

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    title = "RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER FROM WALL FLAMES.",
    abstract = "Measurements of radiative and total heat transfer from flames to wall are presented for combustion of propane, methane, and natural gas. The radiative heat feedback from flames to the wall was determined from measurements using a narrow angle radiometer. The radiative fraction of the total heat feedback was found to be almost independent of the burner power output when plotted against scaled height. Flame radiation increased slightly with height or remained constant depending on the fuel, as long as the flames continuously covered the wall; above this height, it dropped rapidly with height. Among the three fuels tested, radiative fraction in flame-to-wall heat transfer was the maximum for propane and minimum for methane, which can be explained based on sooting characteristics of flames. The total radiative energy transfer as a fraction of the burner output power is also presented for the three fuels.",
    author = "Kulkarni, {Anil Kamalakant}",
    year = "1987",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "81",
    pages = "9--16",
    journal = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Heat Transfer Division, (Publication) HTD",
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    publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME)",

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    T1 - RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER FROM WALL FLAMES.

    AU - Kulkarni, Anil Kamalakant

    PY - 1987

    Y1 - 1987

    N2 - Measurements of radiative and total heat transfer from flames to wall are presented for combustion of propane, methane, and natural gas. The radiative heat feedback from flames to the wall was determined from measurements using a narrow angle radiometer. The radiative fraction of the total heat feedback was found to be almost independent of the burner power output when plotted against scaled height. Flame radiation increased slightly with height or remained constant depending on the fuel, as long as the flames continuously covered the wall; above this height, it dropped rapidly with height. Among the three fuels tested, radiative fraction in flame-to-wall heat transfer was the maximum for propane and minimum for methane, which can be explained based on sooting characteristics of flames. The total radiative energy transfer as a fraction of the burner output power is also presented for the three fuels.

    AB - Measurements of radiative and total heat transfer from flames to wall are presented for combustion of propane, methane, and natural gas. The radiative heat feedback from flames to the wall was determined from measurements using a narrow angle radiometer. The radiative fraction of the total heat feedback was found to be almost independent of the burner power output when plotted against scaled height. Flame radiation increased slightly with height or remained constant depending on the fuel, as long as the flames continuously covered the wall; above this height, it dropped rapidly with height. Among the three fuels tested, radiative fraction in flame-to-wall heat transfer was the maximum for propane and minimum for methane, which can be explained based on sooting characteristics of flames. The total radiative energy transfer as a fraction of the burner output power is also presented for the three fuels.

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