Radio advertising in American political campaigns: The persistence, importance, and effects of narrowcasting

L. Marvin Overby, Jay Barth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although much research has been done on advertising in American political campaigns, virtually all has focused on the use of television. The dearth of work on radio advertising limits our ability to fully understand American electoral dynamics. More campaigns use radio than television, and there is reason to suspect that the narrowcasting that is possible with highly targeted radio ads may be substantively different from the campaign messages that are broadcast over the television airwaves. In this article, we use data from a survey of registered voters in Arkansas and Missouri during the 2002 election season to explore the dynamics of political advertising on the radio. We focus in particular on factors that influence exposure to radio ads, the public's perceptions of the importance of these ads, and the impacts of exposure on the public's perceptions of the quality of the democratic process in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-478
Number of pages28
JournalAmerican Politics Research
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

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