Randomized controlled trial of weight training and lymphedema in breast cancer survivors

Rehana L. Ahmed, William Thomas, Douglas Yee, Kathryn Schmitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

201 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Lymphedema is a common condition that breast cancer survivors face. Despite a lack of supporting evidence from prospective observational studies, occupational and leisure time physical activity are feared to be possible risk factors for lymphedema onset or exacerbation. We examined effects of supervised upper- and lower-body weight training on the incidence and symptoms of lymphedema in 45 breast cancer survivors who participated in the Weight Training for Breast Cancer Survivors study. Methods: Participants were on average 52 years old, 4 to 36 months post-treatment, and had axillary dissection as part of their treatment. Thirteen women had prevalent lymphedema at baseline. The intervention was twice-a-week weight training over a period of 6 months. Lymphedema was monitored at baseline and 6 months by measuring the circumference of each arm, and by self-report of symptoms and clinical diagnosis. Results: None of the intervention-group participants experienced a change in arm circumferences ≥ 2.0 cm after a 6-month exercise intervention. Self-reported incidence of a clinical diagnosis of lymphedema or symptom changes over 6 months did not vary by intervention status (P = .40 and P = .22, respectively). Conclusion: This is the largest randomized controlled trial to examine associations between exercise and lymphedema in breast cancer survivors. The results of this study support the hypotheses that a 6-month intervention of resistance exercise did not increase the risk for or exacerbate symptoms of lymphedema. These results herald the need to start reevaluating common clinical guidelines that breast cancer survivors avoid upper body resistance activity for fear of increasing risk of lymphedema.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2765-2772
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume24
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2006

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Lymphedema
Survivors
Randomized Controlled Trials
Weights and Measures
Exercise
Breast Neoplasms
Arm
Breast Cancer Lymphedema
Leisure Activities
Incidence
Self Report
Fear
Observational Studies
Dissection
Body Weight
Prospective Studies
Guidelines
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ahmed, Rehana L. ; Thomas, William ; Yee, Douglas ; Schmitz, Kathryn. / Randomized controlled trial of weight training and lymphedema in breast cancer survivors. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2006 ; Vol. 24, No. 18. pp. 2765-2772.
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Randomized controlled trial of weight training and lymphedema in breast cancer survivors. / Ahmed, Rehana L.; Thomas, William; Yee, Douglas; Schmitz, Kathryn.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 24, No. 18, 20.06.2006, p. 2765-2772.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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