Rapidly progressive osteoarthritis: Biomechanical considerations

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An underlying hypothesis for rapid cartilage loss in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) is that perturbation from normal joint mechanics produces locally high biomechanical strains that exceed the material properties of the tissue, leading to rapid destruction. Several imaging findings are associated with focally high biomechanical forces and thus are potential candidates for predictive biomarkers of rapid OA progression. This article focuses on 3 aspects of knee biomechanics that have potential magnetic resonance imaging correlates, and which may serve as prognostic biomarkers: knee malalignment, meniscal dysfunction, and injury of the osteochondral unit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-294
Number of pages12
JournalMagnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics of North America
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Osteoarthritis
Knee
Biomarkers
Mechanics
Biomechanical Phenomena
Cartilage
Joints
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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Rapidly progressive osteoarthritis : Biomechanical considerations. / Walker, Eric; Davis, Derik; Mosher, Timothy.

In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics of North America, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.05.2011, p. 283-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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