RAS genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: signal transduction in search of a pathway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

163 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ras proteins in budding yeasts initially appeared to regulate initiation of the cell cycle in response to nutrient availability. More recent work, while clarifying the mechanisms of Ras-mediated signal transduction, bas undermined our notion of the signal Ras transmits. We now suspect that Ras helps to coordinate cellular metabolism and mass accumulation, but what Ras responds to is not clear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-33
Number of pages6
JournalTrends in Genetics
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1991

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ras Proteins
Saccharomycetales
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Signal Transduction
Cell Cycle
Food
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics

Cite this

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abstract = "Ras proteins in budding yeasts initially appeared to regulate initiation of the cell cycle in response to nutrient availability. More recent work, while clarifying the mechanisms of Ras-mediated signal transduction, bas undermined our notion of the signal Ras transmits. We now suspect that Ras helps to coordinate cellular metabolism and mass accumulation, but what Ras responds to is not clear.",
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RAS genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : signal transduction in search of a pathway. / Broach, James R.

In: Trends in Genetics, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.1991, p. 28-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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