Rat strain and sex differences in leptin responses to immobilization stress

Rachel M. Ceballos, Martha M. Faraday, Laura Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of immobilization (IM) stress on plasma leptin levels and bodyweight in adult Sprague-Dawley (19 males, 20 females) and Long-Evans (20 males, 20 females) rats were investigated. Following a 10-day baseline period, half the animals from each experimental group were exposed to immobilization stress or no-stress 20 min/day for 21 days. Plasma leptin and corticosterone levels were measured following stress or no-stress exposure on the last day of the experiment. Corticosterone levels confirmed stress exposure. Important interactive effects of stress, strain, and sex on leptin and corticosterone levels were also observed. Specifically, females displayed higher leptin levels than did males, regardless of stress exposure. Strain interacted with stress such that stressed Long-Evans rats displayed higher leptin levels than did stressed Sprague-Dawley rats; there were no strain differences in leptin levels among nonstressed rats. Also, correlations between leptin and corticosterone were strain-specific. Results are discussed with respect to previously unreported strain differences in the effects of immobilization stress on circulating plasma leptin and the relevance to inconsistent findings in the human literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-146
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Individual Differences
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

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Leptin
Sex Characteristics
Immobilization
Corticosterone
Long Evans Rats
Sprague Dawley Rats

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Ceballos, Rachel M. ; Faraday, Martha M. ; Klein, Laura. / Rat strain and sex differences in leptin responses to immobilization stress. In: Journal of Individual Differences. 2006 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 136-146.
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Rat strain and sex differences in leptin responses to immobilization stress. / Ceballos, Rachel M.; Faraday, Martha M.; Klein, Laura.

In: Journal of Individual Differences, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.09.2006, p. 136-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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