Rational suicide: An empirical investigation of counselor attitudes

James R. Rogers, Christine M. Gueulette, Jodi Abbey-Hines, Jolynn V. Carney, James L. Werth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated attitudes of mental health counselors toward rational suicide. Over 80% of respondents were moderately supportive of the idea that people can make well-reasoned decisions that death is their best option, and further, they identified a consistent set of criteria to evaluate such decisions. Additionally, analyses revealed that as the scenario moved from client, to friend, to self, rational suicide seemed to gain in acceptability for these professionals. Implications for training and practice in light of the apparent responsibilities with suicidal clients defined in the 1995 American Counseling Association's Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-372
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Counseling and Development
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Suicide
Codes of Ethics
Counseling
Mental Health
Counselors
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Rogers, James R. ; Gueulette, Christine M. ; Abbey-Hines, Jodi ; Carney, Jolynn V. ; Werth, James L. / Rational suicide : An empirical investigation of counselor attitudes. In: Journal of Counseling and Development. 2001 ; Vol. 79, No. 3. pp. 365-372.
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Rational suicide : An empirical investigation of counselor attitudes. / Rogers, James R.; Gueulette, Christine M.; Abbey-Hines, Jodi; Carney, Jolynn V.; Werth, James L.

In: Journal of Counseling and Development, Vol. 79, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 365-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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