Reactions to unjust dismissal and third-party dispute resolution: A justice framework

Stuart A. Youngblood, Linda Klebe Trevino, Monica Favia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little previous research has examined why dismissed workers view their discharge as unjust and how they respond to third-party dispute resolution interventions. This exploratory field study relied upon a justice framework to understand complainant motivations for filing unjust dismissal disputes and their reactions to a voluntary conciliation program. Analysis of archival and interview data suggested that procedural justice principles dominated both motivations for filing claims and reactions to third-party intervention. These findings were consistent with previous justice and labor relations research. Implications for future research, management practice, and third-party dispute resolution are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-307
Number of pages25
JournalEmployee Responsibilities and Rights Journal
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1992

Fingerprint

dismissal
justice
labor relations
Personnel
worker
interview
management
Justice
Dispute resolution
Research management
Procedural justice
Dispute
Field study
Third-party intervention
Voluntary programs
Management practices
Labor relations
Workers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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Reactions to unjust dismissal and third-party dispute resolution : A justice framework. / Youngblood, Stuart A.; Trevino, Linda Klebe; Favia, Monica.

In: Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.12.1992, p. 283-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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