Reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot generated by a compression ignition engine using biodiesel, Fischer-tropsch and ultra low sulfur diesel fuels

Kuen Yehliu, Randy Lee Vander Wal, André L. Boehman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This work focuses on the impact of fuel on soot reactivity and nanostructure. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The engine was operated at 2400 rpm and 64 Nm. Three test fuels have been used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic, particularly free of sulfur and aromatic compounds, Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gasto- liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures have been adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing. The reactivity of soot samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis with BP15 and FT soot in order of oxidation rate. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD results show that B100 soot has the smallest average number of stacking layers, while FT soot has the longest basal plane diameter. TEM was used to obtain images of the graphene layers, and a quantitative image analysis algorithm has been developed. B100 soot has the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. The characterization results suggest a relation between soot reactivity and nanostructure: the higher degree of structural disorder is related to the faster oxidation rate of diesel soot even for B100 soot, which is consistent with past work by Vander Wal and co-workers, but in contrast to past work by Boehman and co-workers which identified surface oxygen content as the primary explanation for increased oxidative reactivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009
PublisherCombustion Institute
Pages381-390
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781615676682
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
EventFall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009 - College Park, United States
Duration: Oct 18 2009Oct 21 2009

Publication series

NameFall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009

Other

OtherFall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009
CountryUnited States
CityCollege Park
Period10/18/0910/21/09

Fingerprint

Soot
diesel fuels
Biofuels
soot
Diesel fuels
Biodiesel
Sulfur
ignition
Ignition
engines
Nanostructures
sulfur
reactivity
Engines
fuel tests
rails
Oxidation
oxidation
Rails
Thermogravimetric analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Yehliu, K., Vander Wal, R. L., & Boehman, A. L. (2009). Reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot generated by a compression ignition engine using biodiesel, Fischer-tropsch and ultra low sulfur diesel fuels. In Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009 (pp. 381-390). (Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009). Combustion Institute.
Yehliu, Kuen ; Vander Wal, Randy Lee ; Boehman, André L. / Reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot generated by a compression ignition engine using biodiesel, Fischer-tropsch and ultra low sulfur diesel fuels. Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009. Combustion Institute, 2009. pp. 381-390 (Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009).
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abstract = "This work focuses on the impact of fuel on soot reactivity and nanostructure. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The engine was operated at 2400 rpm and 64 Nm. Three test fuels have been used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic, particularly free of sulfur and aromatic compounds, Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gasto- liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures have been adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing. The reactivity of soot samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis with BP15 and FT soot in order of oxidation rate. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD results show that B100 soot has the smallest average number of stacking layers, while FT soot has the longest basal plane diameter. TEM was used to obtain images of the graphene layers, and a quantitative image analysis algorithm has been developed. B100 soot has the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. The characterization results suggest a relation between soot reactivity and nanostructure: the higher degree of structural disorder is related to the faster oxidation rate of diesel soot even for B100 soot, which is consistent with past work by Vander Wal and co-workers, but in contrast to past work by Boehman and co-workers which identified surface oxygen content as the primary explanation for increased oxidative reactivity.",
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Yehliu, K, Vander Wal, RL & Boehman, AL 2009, Reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot generated by a compression ignition engine using biodiesel, Fischer-tropsch and ultra low sulfur diesel fuels. in Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009. Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009, Combustion Institute, pp. 381-390, Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009, College Park, United States, 10/18/09.

Reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot generated by a compression ignition engine using biodiesel, Fischer-tropsch and ultra low sulfur diesel fuels. / Yehliu, Kuen; Vander Wal, Randy Lee; Boehman, André L.

Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009. Combustion Institute, 2009. p. 381-390 (Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - This work focuses on the impact of fuel on soot reactivity and nanostructure. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The engine was operated at 2400 rpm and 64 Nm. Three test fuels have been used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic, particularly free of sulfur and aromatic compounds, Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gasto- liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures have been adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing. The reactivity of soot samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis with BP15 and FT soot in order of oxidation rate. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD results show that B100 soot has the smallest average number of stacking layers, while FT soot has the longest basal plane diameter. TEM was used to obtain images of the graphene layers, and a quantitative image analysis algorithm has been developed. B100 soot has the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. The characterization results suggest a relation between soot reactivity and nanostructure: the higher degree of structural disorder is related to the faster oxidation rate of diesel soot even for B100 soot, which is consistent with past work by Vander Wal and co-workers, but in contrast to past work by Boehman and co-workers which identified surface oxygen content as the primary explanation for increased oxidative reactivity.

AB - This work focuses on the impact of fuel on soot reactivity and nanostructure. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The engine was operated at 2400 rpm and 64 Nm. Three test fuels have been used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic, particularly free of sulfur and aromatic compounds, Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gasto- liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures have been adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing. The reactivity of soot samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis with BP15 and FT soot in order of oxidation rate. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD results show that B100 soot has the smallest average number of stacking layers, while FT soot has the longest basal plane diameter. TEM was used to obtain images of the graphene layers, and a quantitative image analysis algorithm has been developed. B100 soot has the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. The characterization results suggest a relation between soot reactivity and nanostructure: the higher degree of structural disorder is related to the faster oxidation rate of diesel soot even for B100 soot, which is consistent with past work by Vander Wal and co-workers, but in contrast to past work by Boehman and co-workers which identified surface oxygen content as the primary explanation for increased oxidative reactivity.

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M3 - Conference contribution

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Yehliu K, Vander Wal RL, Boehman AL. Reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot generated by a compression ignition engine using biodiesel, Fischer-tropsch and ultra low sulfur diesel fuels. In Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009. Combustion Institute. 2009. p. 381-390. (Fall Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute 2009).