Reappraisal of the role of dolasetron in prevention and treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with surgery or chemotherapy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and postoperative nausea and vomiting are one of the most frequent but also very concerning consequences for patients undergoing chemotherapy or surgical procedures under general anesthesia. There are a variety of mechanisms involved in the activation of nausea and vomiting. Serotonin, a ubiquitous central and peripheral neurotransmitter, is thought to be the predominant mediator of the perception of nausea and triggering of the vomiting response in both the brain and the periphery via the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT 3) receptor pathways. 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists disrupt this pathway, largely at the level of the vagal afferent pathways, to decrease nausea and vomiting. This review will focus on dolasetron, an older but sill commonly used 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist and its multimodal mechanism of action, safety and tolerability, patient considerations, and a review of the current literature on its use to combat both chemotherapy-induced and postoperative nausea and vomiting in these two important patient populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Management and Research
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 2012

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Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3
Nausea
Vomiting
Drug Therapy
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
Afferent Pathways
Therapeutics
Patient Safety
General Anesthesia
Neurotransmitter Agents
Serotonin
dolasetron
Brain
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Reappraisal of the role of dolasetron in prevention and treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with surgery or chemotherapy",
abstract = "Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and postoperative nausea and vomiting are one of the most frequent but also very concerning consequences for patients undergoing chemotherapy or surgical procedures under general anesthesia. There are a variety of mechanisms involved in the activation of nausea and vomiting. Serotonin, a ubiquitous central and peripheral neurotransmitter, is thought to be the predominant mediator of the perception of nausea and triggering of the vomiting response in both the brain and the periphery via the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT 3) receptor pathways. 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists disrupt this pathway, largely at the level of the vagal afferent pathways, to decrease nausea and vomiting. This review will focus on dolasetron, an older but sill commonly used 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist and its multimodal mechanism of action, safety and tolerability, patient considerations, and a review of the current literature on its use to combat both chemotherapy-induced and postoperative nausea and vomiting in these two important patient populations.",
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AU - Michael Roberts, S.

AU - Bezinover, Dmitri S.

AU - Janicki, Piotr K.

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N2 - Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and postoperative nausea and vomiting are one of the most frequent but also very concerning consequences for patients undergoing chemotherapy or surgical procedures under general anesthesia. There are a variety of mechanisms involved in the activation of nausea and vomiting. Serotonin, a ubiquitous central and peripheral neurotransmitter, is thought to be the predominant mediator of the perception of nausea and triggering of the vomiting response in both the brain and the periphery via the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT 3) receptor pathways. 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists disrupt this pathway, largely at the level of the vagal afferent pathways, to decrease nausea and vomiting. This review will focus on dolasetron, an older but sill commonly used 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist and its multimodal mechanism of action, safety and tolerability, patient considerations, and a review of the current literature on its use to combat both chemotherapy-induced and postoperative nausea and vomiting in these two important patient populations.

AB - Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and postoperative nausea and vomiting are one of the most frequent but also very concerning consequences for patients undergoing chemotherapy or surgical procedures under general anesthesia. There are a variety of mechanisms involved in the activation of nausea and vomiting. Serotonin, a ubiquitous central and peripheral neurotransmitter, is thought to be the predominant mediator of the perception of nausea and triggering of the vomiting response in both the brain and the periphery via the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT 3) receptor pathways. 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists disrupt this pathway, largely at the level of the vagal afferent pathways, to decrease nausea and vomiting. This review will focus on dolasetron, an older but sill commonly used 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist and its multimodal mechanism of action, safety and tolerability, patient considerations, and a review of the current literature on its use to combat both chemotherapy-induced and postoperative nausea and vomiting in these two important patient populations.

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