Recent advances in intracellular and in vivo ROS sensing: Focus on nanoparticle and nanotube applications

Larissa M. Uusitalo, Nadine Hempel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increasingly being implicated in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. Intracellular ROS fluxes are associated with cellular function ranging from proliferation to cell death. Moreover, the importance of subtle, spatio-temporal shifts in ROS during localized cellular signaling events is being realized. Understanding the biochemical nature of the ROS involved will enhance our knowledge of redox-signaling. An ideal intracellular sensor should therefore resolve real-time, localized ROS changes, be highly sensitive to physiologically relevant shifts in ROS and provide specificity towards a particular molecule. For in vivo applications issues such as bioavailability of the probe, tissue penetrance of the signal and signal-to-noise ratio also need to be considered. In the past researchers have heavily relied on the use of ROS-sensitive fluorescent probes and, more recently, genetically engineered ROS sensors. However, there is a great need to improve on current methods to address the above issues. Recently, the field of molecular sensing and imaging has begun to take advantage of the unique physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles and nanotubes. Here we discuss the recent advances in the use of these nanostructures as alternative platforms for ROS sensing, with particular emphasis on intracellular and in vivo ROS detection and quantification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10660-10679
Number of pages20
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Nanotubes
Nanoparticles
Reactive Oxygen Species
nanotubes
nanoparticles
Oxygen
oxygen
Cell signaling
Species Specificity
bioavailability
Molecular Imaging
Penetrance
Nanostructures
probes
shift
sensors
Sensors
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Cell death
Fluorescent Dyes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increasingly being implicated in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. Intracellular ROS fluxes are associated with cellular function ranging from proliferation to cell death. Moreover, the importance of subtle, spatio-temporal shifts in ROS during localized cellular signaling events is being realized. Understanding the biochemical nature of the ROS involved will enhance our knowledge of redox-signaling. An ideal intracellular sensor should therefore resolve real-time, localized ROS changes, be highly sensitive to physiologically relevant shifts in ROS and provide specificity towards a particular molecule. For in vivo applications issues such as bioavailability of the probe, tissue penetrance of the signal and signal-to-noise ratio also need to be considered. In the past researchers have heavily relied on the use of ROS-sensitive fluorescent probes and, more recently, genetically engineered ROS sensors. However, there is a great need to improve on current methods to address the above issues. Recently, the field of molecular sensing and imaging has begun to take advantage of the unique physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles and nanotubes. Here we discuss the recent advances in the use of these nanostructures as alternative platforms for ROS sensing, with particular emphasis on intracellular and in vivo ROS detection and quantification.",
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Recent advances in intracellular and in vivo ROS sensing : Focus on nanoparticle and nanotube applications. / Uusitalo, Larissa M.; Hempel, Nadine.

In: International journal of molecular sciences, Vol. 13, No. 9, 01.09.2012, p. 10660-10679.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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