Recent large earthquakes near Cape Mendocino and in the Gorda Plate: broadband source time functions, fault orientations, and rupture complexities

A. A. Velasco, C. J. Ammon, T. Lay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

The northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction is associated with complex faulting within the Gorda plate and in the convergent zone between the Gorda and North American plates. This region has experienced substantial recent large earthquake activity, and quantification of these faulting processes is essential for understanding the evolution of the triple junction. Using an empirical Green function deconvolution method for teleseismic and regional surface waves and body waves, relative source time functions are obtained for the April 25, 1992, Cape Mendocino thrust earthquake (Mw = 7.2), its two large strike-slip aftershocks, and two large strike-slip events in the Gorda plate that occurred in 1991. Analyzing the directivity effects observed in the source time functions, rupture directions and corresponding fault orientations are resolved for the four largest events and constraints are placed on the smaller aftershock. The existence of multiple active faults in the region constitutes a significant earthquake hazard associated with the complex stress environment of the migrating triple junction. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-728
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume99
Issue numberB1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

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