Receptor Theory and the Ligand-Macromolecule Complex

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A key concept in biological sciences including pharmacology and toxicology is that bioactive small molecules such as drugs, hormones, and nutrients must achieve adequate concentration at a target site in order to elicit a biological response. For many chemicals, the ultimate site of action is a cognate protein or 'receptor.' The main criteria for the operational term 'receptor' are the functions of recognition and transduction. By this definition, a receptor must recognize a distinct chemical entity and translate information from that entity into a form that the cell can interpret, and alter its state accordingly. This altered state may be a change in permeability, activation of a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or an alteration in the transcription of DNA. To differentiate a receptor from an enzyme, the recognition unit should not chemically alter the small molecule and, to differentiate from a binding protein, a receptor must produce a biochemical change and transmit the signal. Often the receptor is a protein and a single component of a large complex of macromolecules that may include other proteins, RNA, and DNA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationComprehensive Toxicology
Subtitle of host publicationSecond Edition
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages27-50
Number of pages24
Volume2-14
ISBN (Print)9780080468846
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Ligands
Proteins
Biological Science Disciplines
DNA
GTP-Binding Proteins
Toxicology
Permeability
Carrier Proteins
Hormones
Pharmacology
RNA
Food
Enzymes
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vanden Heuvel, J. P. (2010). Receptor Theory and the Ligand-Macromolecule Complex. In Comprehensive Toxicology: Second Edition (Vol. 2-14, pp. 27-50). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-046884-6.00203-7
Vanden Heuvel, John Patrick. / Receptor Theory and the Ligand-Macromolecule Complex. Comprehensive Toxicology: Second Edition. Vol. 2-14 Elsevier Inc., 2010. pp. 27-50
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Vanden Heuvel, JP 2010, Receptor Theory and the Ligand-Macromolecule Complex. in Comprehensive Toxicology: Second Edition. vol. 2-14, Elsevier Inc., pp. 27-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-046884-6.00203-7

Receptor Theory and the Ligand-Macromolecule Complex. / Vanden Heuvel, John Patrick.

Comprehensive Toxicology: Second Edition. Vol. 2-14 Elsevier Inc., 2010. p. 27-50.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Vanden Heuvel JP. Receptor Theory and the Ligand-Macromolecule Complex. In Comprehensive Toxicology: Second Edition. Vol. 2-14. Elsevier Inc. 2010. p. 27-50 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-046884-6.00203-7