Recognition of community-acquired anthrax: Has anything changed since 2001?

Mark B. Stephens, Blake Marvin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare responses of practicing military and civilian primary care physicians to a series of standardized inhalational anthrax cases. Methods: A series of three randomly selected case vignettes adapted from the 2001 anthrax attack along the East Coast of the United States were mailed to a convenience sample of community-based primary care physicians. Respondents were asked to list differential diagnoses along with initial management and treatment plans. Results: The response rate was 55% (n = 164). The most common diagnoses were pneumonia and influenza. Few (n = 6) physicians included anthrax in their differential diagnosis. Conclusions: Anthrax remains low on the list of differential diagnoses in the setting of community-acquired respiratory illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-675
Number of pages5
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume175
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

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Anthrax
Differential Diagnosis
Primary Care Physicians
Human Influenza
Pneumonia
Physicians
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Recognition of community-acquired anthrax: Has anything changed since 2001?",
abstract = "Objective: To compare responses of practicing military and civilian primary care physicians to a series of standardized inhalational anthrax cases. Methods: A series of three randomly selected case vignettes adapted from the 2001 anthrax attack along the East Coast of the United States were mailed to a convenience sample of community-based primary care physicians. Respondents were asked to list differential diagnoses along with initial management and treatment plans. Results: The response rate was 55{\%} (n = 164). The most common diagnoses were pneumonia and influenza. Few (n = 6) physicians included anthrax in their differential diagnosis. Conclusions: Anthrax remains low on the list of differential diagnoses in the setting of community-acquired respiratory illness.",
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Recognition of community-acquired anthrax : Has anything changed since 2001? / Stephens, Mark B.; Marvin, Blake.

In: Military medicine, Vol. 175, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 671-675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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