(Re)conceptualizing preservice teacher supervision through duoethnography: Reflecting, supporting, and collaborating with and for each other

Mary Higgins, Amy E. Morton, Rachel Marie Wolkenhauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports on ways duoethnography encouraged reflection, support, and collaboration for two novice teacher educators. Through duoethnographic research, they juxtaposed their experiences in new roles supervising preservice teachers as lived curriculum, or “currere.” Although supervisors often work in isolation, their collaborative research allowed the opportunity to reflect, coach one another through challenging situations, and collaborate on tools and strategies to use with preservice teachers. By engaging in the process of duoethnography, these teacher educators found themselves jointly (re)conceptualizing the role of supervisors. The authors suggest that duoethnography can promote critical reflection and break down supervisor isolation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-84
Number of pages10
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume69
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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supervision
teacher
social isolation
educator
coach
curriculum
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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