Reconfigurable Acoustic Arrays with Deployable Structure Based on a Hoberman-Miura System Synthesis

Ningxiner Zhao, Ryan L. Harne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Curved surfaces are often used to radiate and focus acoustic waves. Yet, when tessellated into reconfigurable surfaces for sake of deployability needs, origami-inspired acoustic arrays may be challenging to hold into curved shape and may not retain flat foldability. On the other hand, deployable mechanisms such as the Hoberman ring are as low-dimensional as many origami tessellations and may maintain curved shape with ease due to ideal rigid bar compositions. This research explores an interface between a Hoberman ring and Miura-ori tessellation that maintain kinematic and geometric compatibility for sake of maintaining curved shapes for sound focusing. The Miura-ori facets are considered to vibrate like baffled pistons and generate acoustic waves that radiate from the ring structure. An analytical model is built to reveal the near field acoustic behavior of acoustic arrays resulting from a Hoberman-Miura system synthesis. Acoustic wave focusing capability is scrutinized and validated through proof-of-principle experiments. Studies reveal wave focusing phenomena distinct to this manifestation of the acoustic array and uncover design and operational influences on wave focusing effectiveness. The results encourage exploration of new interfaces between reconfigurable mechanisms and origami devices where low-dimensional shape change is desired.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number063301
JournalJournal of Mechanical Design, Transactions of the ASME
Volume143
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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