Rectal mucosal quantitative galactose oxidase-Schiff reaction as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer: Comparison to fecal occult stool blood test

MacK T. Ruffin, Daniel P. Normolle, Michael J. Evelegh, John A. Baron, Robert S. Bresalier, Norman E. Marcon, Sapna Syngal, D. Kim Turgeon, Melissa K. Tuck, Dean E. Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The galactose oxidase-Schiff (GOS) reaction detects D-galactose-β-[1, 3]-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. This is a T-antigen expressed in mucus from malignant cells and colonic mucosa adjacent to cancer but not in normal mucosa. Previous studies using a qualitative GOS assay proved to be of limited value for the detection of colorectal neoplasia. We used a newly developed quantitative GOS assay to determine its potential as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer. We completed a multi-center, prospective, cross-sectional cohort validation study consisting of 70 normal controls, 23 high-risk normal patients (polyp history or family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) with currently normal colonoscopy), 137 patients with adenomatous polyps, and 69 with colorectal cancers. Prior to colonoscopy, two samples of stool were collected via a rectal exam: one for FOBT, and one for GOS. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for detecting colonic adenomas and cancer for normal colons, computed with logistic regression was 0.69 for GOS, 0.62 for FOBT, and 0.73 for GOS combined with FOBT. Adding GOS to FOBT did not significantly change the ROC of FOBT alone. GOS does not appear to be a suitable marker of colorectal neoplasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-112
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Biomarkers
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Galactose Oxidase
Occult Blood
Hematologic Tests
Colorectal Neoplasms
Biomarkers
Colonoscopy
Colonic Neoplasms
Mucous Membrane
Adenomatous Polyps
Acetylgalactosamine
Neoplasms
Validation Studies
Viral Tumor Antigens
Mucus
Polyps
Galactose
ROC Curve
Adenoma
Area Under Curve
Cohort Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ruffin, MacK T. ; Normolle, Daniel P. ; Evelegh, Michael J. ; Baron, John A. ; Bresalier, Robert S. ; Marcon, Norman E. ; Syngal, Sapna ; Turgeon, D. Kim ; Tuck, Melissa K. ; Brenner, Dean E. / Rectal mucosal quantitative galactose oxidase-Schiff reaction as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer : Comparison to fecal occult stool blood test. In: Cancer Biomarkers. 2010 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 109-112.
@article{1415db10ef5f45f0843a352351ac2ad4,
title = "Rectal mucosal quantitative galactose oxidase-Schiff reaction as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer: Comparison to fecal occult stool blood test",
abstract = "The galactose oxidase-Schiff (GOS) reaction detects D-galactose-β-[1, 3]-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. This is a T-antigen expressed in mucus from malignant cells and colonic mucosa adjacent to cancer but not in normal mucosa. Previous studies using a qualitative GOS assay proved to be of limited value for the detection of colorectal neoplasia. We used a newly developed quantitative GOS assay to determine its potential as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer. We completed a multi-center, prospective, cross-sectional cohort validation study consisting of 70 normal controls, 23 high-risk normal patients (polyp history or family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) with currently normal colonoscopy), 137 patients with adenomatous polyps, and 69 with colorectal cancers. Prior to colonoscopy, two samples of stool were collected via a rectal exam: one for FOBT, and one for GOS. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for detecting colonic adenomas and cancer for normal colons, computed with logistic regression was 0.69 for GOS, 0.62 for FOBT, and 0.73 for GOS combined with FOBT. Adding GOS to FOBT did not significantly change the ROC of FOBT alone. GOS does not appear to be a suitable marker of colorectal neoplasia.",
author = "Ruffin, {MacK T.} and Normolle, {Daniel P.} and Evelegh, {Michael J.} and Baron, {John A.} and Bresalier, {Robert S.} and Marcon, {Norman E.} and Sapna Syngal and Turgeon, {D. Kim} and Tuck, {Melissa K.} and Brenner, {Dean E.}",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3233/CBM-2011-0206",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "109--112",
journal = "Cancer Biomarkers",
issn = "1574-0153",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "2",

}

Ruffin, MT, Normolle, DP, Evelegh, MJ, Baron, JA, Bresalier, RS, Marcon, NE, Syngal, S, Turgeon, DK, Tuck, MK & Brenner, DE 2010, 'Rectal mucosal quantitative galactose oxidase-Schiff reaction as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer: Comparison to fecal occult stool blood test', Cancer Biomarkers, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 109-112. https://doi.org/10.3233/CBM-2011-0206

Rectal mucosal quantitative galactose oxidase-Schiff reaction as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer : Comparison to fecal occult stool blood test. / Ruffin, MacK T.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Evelegh, Michael J.; Baron, John A.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Marcon, Norman E.; Syngal, Sapna; Turgeon, D. Kim; Tuck, Melissa K.; Brenner, Dean E.

In: Cancer Biomarkers, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.12.2010, p. 109-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rectal mucosal quantitative galactose oxidase-Schiff reaction as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer

T2 - Comparison to fecal occult stool blood test

AU - Ruffin, MacK T.

AU - Normolle, Daniel P.

AU - Evelegh, Michael J.

AU - Baron, John A.

AU - Bresalier, Robert S.

AU - Marcon, Norman E.

AU - Syngal, Sapna

AU - Turgeon, D. Kim

AU - Tuck, Melissa K.

AU - Brenner, Dean E.

PY - 2010/12/1

Y1 - 2010/12/1

N2 - The galactose oxidase-Schiff (GOS) reaction detects D-galactose-β-[1, 3]-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. This is a T-antigen expressed in mucus from malignant cells and colonic mucosa adjacent to cancer but not in normal mucosa. Previous studies using a qualitative GOS assay proved to be of limited value for the detection of colorectal neoplasia. We used a newly developed quantitative GOS assay to determine its potential as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer. We completed a multi-center, prospective, cross-sectional cohort validation study consisting of 70 normal controls, 23 high-risk normal patients (polyp history or family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) with currently normal colonoscopy), 137 patients with adenomatous polyps, and 69 with colorectal cancers. Prior to colonoscopy, two samples of stool were collected via a rectal exam: one for FOBT, and one for GOS. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for detecting colonic adenomas and cancer for normal colons, computed with logistic regression was 0.69 for GOS, 0.62 for FOBT, and 0.73 for GOS combined with FOBT. Adding GOS to FOBT did not significantly change the ROC of FOBT alone. GOS does not appear to be a suitable marker of colorectal neoplasia.

AB - The galactose oxidase-Schiff (GOS) reaction detects D-galactose-β-[1, 3]-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. This is a T-antigen expressed in mucus from malignant cells and colonic mucosa adjacent to cancer but not in normal mucosa. Previous studies using a qualitative GOS assay proved to be of limited value for the detection of colorectal neoplasia. We used a newly developed quantitative GOS assay to determine its potential as an early detection biomarker for colorectal cancer. We completed a multi-center, prospective, cross-sectional cohort validation study consisting of 70 normal controls, 23 high-risk normal patients (polyp history or family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) with currently normal colonoscopy), 137 patients with adenomatous polyps, and 69 with colorectal cancers. Prior to colonoscopy, two samples of stool were collected via a rectal exam: one for FOBT, and one for GOS. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for detecting colonic adenomas and cancer for normal colons, computed with logistic regression was 0.69 for GOS, 0.62 for FOBT, and 0.73 for GOS combined with FOBT. Adding GOS to FOBT did not significantly change the ROC of FOBT alone. GOS does not appear to be a suitable marker of colorectal neoplasia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052567594&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052567594&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/CBM-2011-0206

DO - 10.3233/CBM-2011-0206

M3 - Article

C2 - 21896998

AN - SCOPUS:80052567594

VL - 8

SP - 109

EP - 112

JO - Cancer Biomarkers

JF - Cancer Biomarkers

SN - 1574-0153

IS - 2

ER -