Redshirting and early retention: Who gets the "gift of time" and what are its outcomes?

M. Elizabeth Graue, James Clyde Diperna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes the results of a study that examined the prevalence of the delay of kindergarten entry, also known as academic redshirting. Utilizing a representative sample of Wisconsin school districts, the authors examined the school records of more than 8,000 students to depict patterns of school entry, promotion, subsequent special services, and student achievement. Results indicate that approximately 7% of the sample had delayed school entry and that those children were primarily boys with birthdates immediately before the entrance cutoff. Redshirts and retainees are more likely to receive special education services than their peers who enter and are promoted on time. The achievement of redsbirts is comparable to their normally entered peers; whereas retainees perform at lower levels. Although the interpretations of these results depend on the perspective taken on extra-year interventions, they can be read in the context of other literature on extra-year interventions. We suggest next steps for the development of empirical knowledge on redshirting and for evaluating the efficacy of this practice. Given its lack of empirical efficacy, we do not support widespread use of this strategy for increasing readiness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-534
Number of pages26
JournalAmerican Educational Research Journal
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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gift
school
kindergarten
special education
promotion
student
district
interpretation
time
lack

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Redshirting and early retention : Who gets the "gift of time" and what are its outcomes? / Graue, M. Elizabeth; Diperna, James Clyde.

In: American Educational Research Journal, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 509-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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