Reduce the matrix effect in biological tissue imaging using dynamic reactive ionization and gas cluster ion beams

Hua Tian, Andreas Wucher, Nicholas Winograd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the context of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) experiment, dynamic reactive ionization (DRI) involves introducing a reactive dopant, HCl, into an Ar gas cluster primary ion beam along with a source of water to enable dissociation of HCl to free protons. This concerted effect, precisely occurring at the impact site of the cluster beam, enhances the protonation of molecular species. Here, the authors apply this methodology to study the hippocampus and cerebellum region of a frozen-hydrated mouse brain section. To determine the degree of enhancement associated with DRI conditions, sequential tissue slices were arranged in a mirrored configuration so that comparable regions of the tissue could be explored. The results show that the protonated lipid species are increased by ~10-fold, but that the normally prevalent salt adducts are virtually unaffected. This observation is discussed as a novel approach to minimizing SIMS matrix effects in complex materials. Moreover, the chemical images of protonated lipid ions exhibit clearer features in the cerebellum region as compared to images acquired with the pure Ar cluster beam.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number02A320
JournalBiointerphases
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biomaterials
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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