Abstract

Objectives: The primary objective was to determine the rate of breastfeeding by gestational age reported by new mothers 1 month postpartum, with particular focus on early term newborns (37-386/7 weeks). Materials and Methods: Three thousand six primiparous women aged 18-36 years were interviewed during their third trimester and again 1 month postpartum. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the association between gestational age and breastfeeding 1 month postpartum among those who reported that they planned to breastfeed, controlling for potentially confounding variables. Results: Two thousand seven hundred seventy-two women planned to breastfeed (92.2%), among whom 116 (4.2%) delivered late preterm (34-366/7 weeks), 519 (18.7%) early term (37-386/7 weeks), and 2,137 (77.1%) term or postterm (39+ weeks). Among those who delivered late preterm, 63.8% were breastfeeding 1 month postpartum, early term 72.6%, and term or postterm 76.5%. This relationship was verified by a multivariate logistic regression analysis; late preterm newborns were significantly less likely to be breastfeeding 1 month postpartum than the term or postterm newborns (odds ratio [OR] 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.69; p ≤ 0.0001), as were early term newborns (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.60-0.99; p = 0.038). Conclusions: In this large prospective study of first-time mothers and newborns, gestational age was significantly associated with breastfeeding 1 month postpartum; highlighting late preterm and early term infants as populations at risk for shortened breastfeeding duration and the need to create specific breastfeeding support and education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-125
Number of pages7
JournalBreastfeeding Medicine
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Breast Feeding
Postpartum Period
Newborn Infant
Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Mothers
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Prospective Studies
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics
  • Health Policy
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

@article{c3bbaac550c04858962794f4b610231c,
title = "Reduced breastfeeding rates in firstborn late preterm and early term infants",
abstract = "Objectives: The primary objective was to determine the rate of breastfeeding by gestational age reported by new mothers 1 month postpartum, with particular focus on early term newborns (37-386/7 weeks). Materials and Methods: Three thousand six primiparous women aged 18-36 years were interviewed during their third trimester and again 1 month postpartum. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the association between gestational age and breastfeeding 1 month postpartum among those who reported that they planned to breastfeed, controlling for potentially confounding variables. Results: Two thousand seven hundred seventy-two women planned to breastfeed (92.2{\%}), among whom 116 (4.2{\%}) delivered late preterm (34-366/7 weeks), 519 (18.7{\%}) early term (37-386/7 weeks), and 2,137 (77.1{\%}) term or postterm (39+ weeks). Among those who delivered late preterm, 63.8{\%} were breastfeeding 1 month postpartum, early term 72.6{\%}, and term or postterm 76.5{\%}. This relationship was verified by a multivariate logistic regression analysis; late preterm newborns were significantly less likely to be breastfeeding 1 month postpartum than the term or postterm newborns (odds ratio [OR] 0.44; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.69; p ≤ 0.0001), as were early term newborns (OR 0.77; 95{\%} CI 0.60-0.99; p = 0.038). Conclusions: In this large prospective study of first-time mothers and newborns, gestational age was significantly associated with breastfeeding 1 month postpartum; highlighting late preterm and early term infants as populations at risk for shortened breastfeeding duration and the need to create specific breastfeeding support and education.",
author = "Nicole Hackman and Natasha Alligood-Percoco and Ashley Martin and Junjia Zhu and Kristen Kjerulff",
year = "2016",
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Reduced breastfeeding rates in firstborn late preterm and early term infants. / Hackman, Nicole; Alligood-Percoco, Natasha; Martin, Ashley; Zhu, Junjia; Kjerulff, Kristen.

In: Breastfeeding Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.04.2016, p. 119-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Reduced breastfeeding rates in firstborn late preterm and early term infants

AU - Hackman, Nicole

AU - Alligood-Percoco, Natasha

AU - Martin, Ashley

AU - Zhu, Junjia

AU - Kjerulff, Kristen

PY - 2016/4/1

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N2 - Objectives: The primary objective was to determine the rate of breastfeeding by gestational age reported by new mothers 1 month postpartum, with particular focus on early term newborns (37-386/7 weeks). Materials and Methods: Three thousand six primiparous women aged 18-36 years were interviewed during their third trimester and again 1 month postpartum. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the association between gestational age and breastfeeding 1 month postpartum among those who reported that they planned to breastfeed, controlling for potentially confounding variables. Results: Two thousand seven hundred seventy-two women planned to breastfeed (92.2%), among whom 116 (4.2%) delivered late preterm (34-366/7 weeks), 519 (18.7%) early term (37-386/7 weeks), and 2,137 (77.1%) term or postterm (39+ weeks). Among those who delivered late preterm, 63.8% were breastfeeding 1 month postpartum, early term 72.6%, and term or postterm 76.5%. This relationship was verified by a multivariate logistic regression analysis; late preterm newborns were significantly less likely to be breastfeeding 1 month postpartum than the term or postterm newborns (odds ratio [OR] 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.69; p ≤ 0.0001), as were early term newborns (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.60-0.99; p = 0.038). Conclusions: In this large prospective study of first-time mothers and newborns, gestational age was significantly associated with breastfeeding 1 month postpartum; highlighting late preterm and early term infants as populations at risk for shortened breastfeeding duration and the need to create specific breastfeeding support and education.

AB - Objectives: The primary objective was to determine the rate of breastfeeding by gestational age reported by new mothers 1 month postpartum, with particular focus on early term newborns (37-386/7 weeks). Materials and Methods: Three thousand six primiparous women aged 18-36 years were interviewed during their third trimester and again 1 month postpartum. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the association between gestational age and breastfeeding 1 month postpartum among those who reported that they planned to breastfeed, controlling for potentially confounding variables. Results: Two thousand seven hundred seventy-two women planned to breastfeed (92.2%), among whom 116 (4.2%) delivered late preterm (34-366/7 weeks), 519 (18.7%) early term (37-386/7 weeks), and 2,137 (77.1%) term or postterm (39+ weeks). Among those who delivered late preterm, 63.8% were breastfeeding 1 month postpartum, early term 72.6%, and term or postterm 76.5%. This relationship was verified by a multivariate logistic regression analysis; late preterm newborns were significantly less likely to be breastfeeding 1 month postpartum than the term or postterm newborns (odds ratio [OR] 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.69; p ≤ 0.0001), as were early term newborns (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.60-0.99; p = 0.038). Conclusions: In this large prospective study of first-time mothers and newborns, gestational age was significantly associated with breastfeeding 1 month postpartum; highlighting late preterm and early term infants as populations at risk for shortened breastfeeding duration and the need to create specific breastfeeding support and education.

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