Reduced impact of alcohol use on next-day tiredness in older relative to younger adults

A role for sleep duration

David M. Lydon-Staley, Nilam Ram, Annette Brose, Florian Schmiedek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent work has suggested that older adults may be less susceptible to the next-day effects of alcohol relative to younger adults. The effects of alcohol in younger adults may be mediated by sleep duration, but due to age differences in the contexts of alcohol use, this mediation process may not generalize to older adults. The present study examined age-group (younger vs. older adults) differences in how alcohol use influenced next-day tiredness during daily life. Reports of alcohol use, sleep duration, and next-day tiredness obtained on -101 days from 91 younger adults (ages 20-31 years) and 75 older adults (ages 65-80 years) were modeled using a multilevel, moderated mediation framework. Findings indicated that (a) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with greater-than-usual tiredness in younger adults only, (b) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with shorter-than-usual sleep duration in younger adults only, and (c) shorter-than-usual sleep duration was associated with greater tiredness in both younger and older adults. For the prototypical younger adult, a significant portion (43%) of the association between alcohol use and next-day tiredness could be explained assuming mediation through sleep duration, whereas there was no evidence of mediation for the prototypical older adult. Findings of age differences in the mediation process underlying associations among alcohol use, sleep, and tiredness provide insight into the mechanisms driving recent observations of reduced next-day effects of alcohol in older relative to younger adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-653
Number of pages12
JournalPsychology and aging
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Young Adult
Sleep
Alcohols
Age Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Lydon-Staley, David M. ; Ram, Nilam ; Brose, Annette ; Schmiedek, Florian. / Reduced impact of alcohol use on next-day tiredness in older relative to younger adults : A role for sleep duration. In: Psychology and aging. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 7. pp. 642-653.
@article{74a3e9ce9f1844fd83af66f2ef8bb86a,
title = "Reduced impact of alcohol use on next-day tiredness in older relative to younger adults: A role for sleep duration",
abstract = "Recent work has suggested that older adults may be less susceptible to the next-day effects of alcohol relative to younger adults. The effects of alcohol in younger adults may be mediated by sleep duration, but due to age differences in the contexts of alcohol use, this mediation process may not generalize to older adults. The present study examined age-group (younger vs. older adults) differences in how alcohol use influenced next-day tiredness during daily life. Reports of alcohol use, sleep duration, and next-day tiredness obtained on -101 days from 91 younger adults (ages 20-31 years) and 75 older adults (ages 65-80 years) were modeled using a multilevel, moderated mediation framework. Findings indicated that (a) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with greater-than-usual tiredness in younger adults only, (b) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with shorter-than-usual sleep duration in younger adults only, and (c) shorter-than-usual sleep duration was associated with greater tiredness in both younger and older adults. For the prototypical younger adult, a significant portion (43{\%}) of the association between alcohol use and next-day tiredness could be explained assuming mediation through sleep duration, whereas there was no evidence of mediation for the prototypical older adult. Findings of age differences in the mediation process underlying associations among alcohol use, sleep, and tiredness provide insight into the mechanisms driving recent observations of reduced next-day effects of alcohol in older relative to younger adults.",
author = "Lydon-Staley, {David M.} and Nilam Ram and Annette Brose and Florian Schmiedek",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/pag0000198",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "642--653",
journal = "Psychology and Aging",
issn = "0882-7974",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "7",

}

Reduced impact of alcohol use on next-day tiredness in older relative to younger adults : A role for sleep duration. / Lydon-Staley, David M.; Ram, Nilam; Brose, Annette; Schmiedek, Florian.

In: Psychology and aging, Vol. 32, No. 7, 01.11.2017, p. 642-653.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reduced impact of alcohol use on next-day tiredness in older relative to younger adults

T2 - A role for sleep duration

AU - Lydon-Staley, David M.

AU - Ram, Nilam

AU - Brose, Annette

AU - Schmiedek, Florian

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - Recent work has suggested that older adults may be less susceptible to the next-day effects of alcohol relative to younger adults. The effects of alcohol in younger adults may be mediated by sleep duration, but due to age differences in the contexts of alcohol use, this mediation process may not generalize to older adults. The present study examined age-group (younger vs. older adults) differences in how alcohol use influenced next-day tiredness during daily life. Reports of alcohol use, sleep duration, and next-day tiredness obtained on -101 days from 91 younger adults (ages 20-31 years) and 75 older adults (ages 65-80 years) were modeled using a multilevel, moderated mediation framework. Findings indicated that (a) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with greater-than-usual tiredness in younger adults only, (b) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with shorter-than-usual sleep duration in younger adults only, and (c) shorter-than-usual sleep duration was associated with greater tiredness in both younger and older adults. For the prototypical younger adult, a significant portion (43%) of the association between alcohol use and next-day tiredness could be explained assuming mediation through sleep duration, whereas there was no evidence of mediation for the prototypical older adult. Findings of age differences in the mediation process underlying associations among alcohol use, sleep, and tiredness provide insight into the mechanisms driving recent observations of reduced next-day effects of alcohol in older relative to younger adults.

AB - Recent work has suggested that older adults may be less susceptible to the next-day effects of alcohol relative to younger adults. The effects of alcohol in younger adults may be mediated by sleep duration, but due to age differences in the contexts of alcohol use, this mediation process may not generalize to older adults. The present study examined age-group (younger vs. older adults) differences in how alcohol use influenced next-day tiredness during daily life. Reports of alcohol use, sleep duration, and next-day tiredness obtained on -101 days from 91 younger adults (ages 20-31 years) and 75 older adults (ages 65-80 years) were modeled using a multilevel, moderated mediation framework. Findings indicated that (a) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with greater-than-usual tiredness in younger adults only, (b) greater-than-usual alcohol use was associated with shorter-than-usual sleep duration in younger adults only, and (c) shorter-than-usual sleep duration was associated with greater tiredness in both younger and older adults. For the prototypical younger adult, a significant portion (43%) of the association between alcohol use and next-day tiredness could be explained assuming mediation through sleep duration, whereas there was no evidence of mediation for the prototypical older adult. Findings of age differences in the mediation process underlying associations among alcohol use, sleep, and tiredness provide insight into the mechanisms driving recent observations of reduced next-day effects of alcohol in older relative to younger adults.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030857283&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030857283&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/pag0000198

DO - 10.1037/pag0000198

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 642

EP - 653

JO - Psychology and Aging

JF - Psychology and Aging

SN - 0882-7974

IS - 7

ER -