Reducing odor emissions using subsurface litter application technology

Michael L. Hile, Robin C. Brandt, Arthur L. Allen, Eileen Fabian-Wheeler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Manure handling and application to agricultural land from animal facilities can create odor nuisances where population sprawl encroaches into once rural areas. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) and The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) collaborated on a study to quantify the odor reduction benefit of a novel technology called the Subsurfer, which incorporates dry poultry litter below the soil surface as opposed to traditional surface application. Two 25-meter square locations having similar grassy vegetation were chosen at Penn State's Ag Progress Days site. For three separate events, the Subsurfer was used to subsurface and surface apply Turkey litter to the two locations. Odor assessment teams of trained and qualified individuals from UMES and Penn State conducted observations at each location prior to litter application (background odor), and at 1, 4, and 24 hours after the litter was applied at each location. Whole air samples were collected in 10-liter Tedlar™ bags four hours after litter application using surface isolation flux chambers and vacuum suitcases. The samples were analyzed using dynamic forced-choice olfactometry at the Penn State Odor Assessment Laboratory. Results show 89.5% to 95.6% reduction in field D/Twhen litter was incorporated into the soil using the Subsurfer versus surface application with this same technology after 1 hr of application (97.6 to 100% when background odor level was subtracted). Four hours after application, laboratory DT show odor emissions were reduced by 81% (100% less background levels).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
PublisherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Pages1086-1093
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781510810501
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015 - New Orleans, United States
Duration: Jul 26 2015Jul 29 2015

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
Volume2

Other

OtherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period7/26/157/29/15

Fingerprint

odor emissions
application technology
Odors
odors
manure handling
olfactometry
Soils
Poultry
poultry manure
Polyethylene Terephthalates
Manures
rural areas
bags
agricultural land
soil
Turkey (country)
Animals
sampling
air
Vacuum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Hile, M. L., Brandt, R. C., Allen, A. L., & Fabian-Wheeler, E. (2015). Reducing odor emissions using subsurface litter application technology. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015 (pp. 1086-1093). (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015; Vol. 2). American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. https://doi.org/10.13031/aim.20152182493
Hile, Michael L. ; Brandt, Robin C. ; Allen, Arthur L. ; Fabian-Wheeler, Eileen. / Reducing odor emissions using subsurface litter application technology. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. pp. 1086-1093 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015).
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abstract = "Manure handling and application to agricultural land from animal facilities can create odor nuisances where population sprawl encroaches into once rural areas. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) and The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) collaborated on a study to quantify the odor reduction benefit of a novel technology called the Subsurfer, which incorporates dry poultry litter below the soil surface as opposed to traditional surface application. Two 25-meter square locations having similar grassy vegetation were chosen at Penn State's Ag Progress Days site. For three separate events, the Subsurfer was used to subsurface and surface apply Turkey litter to the two locations. Odor assessment teams of trained and qualified individuals from UMES and Penn State conducted observations at each location prior to litter application (background odor), and at 1, 4, and 24 hours after the litter was applied at each location. Whole air samples were collected in 10-liter Tedlar™ bags four hours after litter application using surface isolation flux chambers and vacuum suitcases. The samples were analyzed using dynamic forced-choice olfactometry at the Penn State Odor Assessment Laboratory. Results show 89.5{\%} to 95.6{\%} reduction in field D/Twhen litter was incorporated into the soil using the Subsurfer versus surface application with this same technology after 1 hr of application (97.6 to 100{\%} when background odor level was subtracted). Four hours after application, laboratory DT show odor emissions were reduced by 81{\%} (100{\%} less background levels).",
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Hile, ML, Brandt, RC, Allen, AL & Fabian-Wheeler, E 2015, Reducing odor emissions using subsurface litter application technology. in American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015, vol. 2, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, pp. 1086-1093, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015, New Orleans, United States, 7/26/15. https://doi.org/10.13031/aim.20152182493

Reducing odor emissions using subsurface litter application technology. / Hile, Michael L.; Brandt, Robin C.; Allen, Arthur L.; Fabian-Wheeler, Eileen.

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. p. 1086-1093 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Hile ML, Brandt RC, Allen AL, Fabian-Wheeler E. Reducing odor emissions using subsurface litter application technology. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 2015. p. 1086-1093. (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015). https://doi.org/10.13031/aim.20152182493