Reductions in mortality associated with intensive public reporting of hospital outcomes

Christopher S. Hollenbeak, Christopher P. Gorton, Ying P. Tabak, Jayne L. Jones, Arnold Milstein, Richard S. Johannes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is unclear whether public reporting of hospital and physician performance has improved outcomes for the conditions being reported. We studied the effect of intensive public reporting on hospital mortality for 6 high-frequency, high-mortality medical conditions. Patients in Pennsylvania were matched to patients in other states with varying public reporting environments using propensity score methods. The effect of public reporting was estimated using a difference in differences approach. Patients treated at hospitals subjected to intensive public reporting had significantly lower odds of in-hospital mortality when compared with similar patients treated at hospitals in environments with no public reporting or only limited reporting. Overall, the 2000-2003 in-hospital mortality odds ratio for Pennsylvania patients versus non-Pennsylvania patients ranged from 0.59 to 0.79 across 6 clinical conditions (all P <.0001). For the same comparison using the 1997-1999 period, odds ratios ranged from 0.72 to 0.90, suggesting improvement when intensive public reporting occurred.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-286
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

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Public Hospitals
Mortality
Hospital Mortality
Odds Ratio
Propensity Score
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Hollenbeak, Christopher S. ; Gorton, Christopher P. ; Tabak, Ying P. ; Jones, Jayne L. ; Milstein, Arnold ; Johannes, Richard S. / Reductions in mortality associated with intensive public reporting of hospital outcomes. In: American Journal of Medical Quality. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 279-286.
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Reductions in mortality associated with intensive public reporting of hospital outcomes. / Hollenbeak, Christopher S.; Gorton, Christopher P.; Tabak, Ying P.; Jones, Jayne L.; Milstein, Arnold; Johannes, Richard S.

In: American Journal of Medical Quality, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.07.2008, p. 279-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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