Refugees and the Case for International Authority in the Middle East: The League of Nations and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East Compared

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Abstract

In the immediate aftermath of World War I, the newly formed League of Nations saw Middle Eastern refugees-particularly displaced Armenians and Assyrians scattered in camps across the Eastern Mediterranean- A s venues for working out new forms of internationalism. In the late 1940s, following the British abandonment of the Palestine Mandate and the subsequent Zionist expulsion of most of the Palestinian Arab population, the new United Nations revived this concept of a refugee crisis requiring international intervention. This paper examines the parallel ways in which advocates for both the nascent League of Nations and the United Nations made use of mass refugee flows to formulate arguments for new, highly visible, and essentially permanent iterations of international authority across the Middle East.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-644
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Middle East Studies
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science

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